Starting out on the cheap

Discussion in 'Lets talk Business!' started by Mikey P, Jul 3, 2018.

  1. TomKing
    TomKing

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    Our guys clean high end upholstery, the finest brands and fabrics with our truck mounts every day.
    Jim Pemberton likes this.
  2. Derrick T.
    Derrick T.

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    YES! THIS!
  3. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    Of course you can, the question is why would you want to?

    The TM advantage on carpet of extra heat, vacuum and flushing becomes its disadvantage on nice upholstery
  4. Lee Stockwell
    Lee Stockwell

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    Not in practice.
  5. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    Suppose it depends on your TM setup

    The air howl through the tool when I do use my TM on greasy microfibre has me wearing airplugs.
    I have thought about putting another vacuum relief inline to cut the noise and vacuum.

    How do you address the excess vacuum?
  6. Bob Pruitt
    Bob Pruitt

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    ss-upc-ea_1.jpg I use this with my Butler on medium and the heat turned down a little...works great.
  7. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    Im running an aircooled slide in, I cant run the engine slower without compromising the engines cooling
    20180707_131805.jpg
    What TM heat and vacuum has done to 1 of my PMF tools, reluctant to buy a high flow tool as that means more heat ...
  8. Lee Stockwell
    Lee Stockwell

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    Everything is adjustable, temp, pressure, rpm, vacuum relief.

    Easy peasy.
  9. Bob Pruitt
    Bob Pruitt

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  10. Jim Pemberton
    Jim Pemberton

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    If you have the ability to do everything Lee just said (some "super units" can't be cooled down enough for delicate upholstery), you can do most anything with the truck mount.

    You get fabric dryer when you clean with a truck mount for two reasons;

    1. More vacuum (obvious)

    2. Less humidity (not so obvious). Portables exhaust humid air into the work airspace, and the higher humidity slows down drying.

    There are a few hypersensitive things out there that might be tricky to do with a truck mount, but for anything that sensitive, hand cleaning is a safer option than a portable.

    Do watch what you are running through your truck mount too. Not everyone has the discipline to "switch" solutions back at the unit.
    Lee Stockwell and Bob Pruitt like this.
  11. Bob Pruitt
    Bob Pruitt

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    Maybe the Saiger rinse will solve that issue for me. For now it's switching back and forth...
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  12. Mikey P
    Mikey P

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    You are far from the average laid off factory worker who thinks carpet cleaning will be an easy path to $500 a day riches..
  13. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

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    Vac relief on the tool. All of my tools have a vac relief. Heat is controllable
  14. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    Opening the vac relief on my PMF hand tools take them from being uncomfortable to use to being unbearable without ear plugs.. they HOWL

    And I've been reluctant to buy more $$$ high flow/hotter plastic tool if its still going to melt like my earlier pic :neutral:
  15. Jim Pemberton
    Jim Pemberton

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    The PMF tool was once my "go to tool", and I still have one handy for detail work. The $$$$$$$ high flow, rotomolded tools won't melt on you.

    That said, if you have that much heat and can't cool it down, you are best to use a portable. I have seen color loss and texture damage issues from high heat. How is the heat produced on your truck mount, and how is it controlled?

    Be careful with the PMF tool with velvets; you can get a "center streak" that is difficult to remove from natural fiber velvet, and impossible to get out of a synthetic fiber velvet if you cook it.

    Ask me how I know ..

    There isn't a way to damage upholstery that I haven't done myself...sometimes more than once.
  16. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    That was a #2 little giant at the end of 150ft of hose that melted that hand tool, my main fuel burner has digital thermostat that can control the heat precisely between 60 degree C and 120 degree C give or take 2 degree at the machine
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  17. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    I haven't damaged a piece (that I'm aware of) but have seen more than a few damaged pieces left from my competitors, they run Boxxer 318's and spitfire 3.2's not exactly known as high performance machines but they "presumably" had uncontrolled heat spikes which left heat set fibre distortion or colour loss that I couldn't correct..

    That aside how loud is that SS tool compared to the PMF with the vac relief open on a truckmount?
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2018
  18. Old Coastie
    Old Coastie

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    I may be the poster child on how to start small, wrong and stay that way.

    Here is what I would do differently:

    1: Work six months for some company, with the secret attitude that there MUST be a better way and to find it.

    2: During that time, find a hard boiled mentor and ask these very questions.

    3: Allocate a disciplined number of days or hours per day to prospect, self educate and work. The absolute bane of self employment is being flexible with people who “need” you.

    I do not regret much. In 7 years I have learned how to effectively use vapor steam to clean most surfaces, how to refinish stone and clean most hard surfaces, how to do yoeman’s work on upholstery and when to walk feom fabrics and Persian rugs, how to clean carpet to the point people are satisfied and even complimentary and above all, to enjoy my work.

    I’ve been blessed to have the equipment at hand when friends had plumbing failures and needed a slurp, when my own basement flooded and even when the mother in law floated herself in poop. I already knew how to shape and set tile or stone and can clean exterior surfaces with the best.

    What I cannot do is plan or form the vision of where to be by a certain time. I’m stubborn and persistent, but in a plodding, donkeyish, first gear sort of way, as a result. Time is no longer my friend, though and I work with a broken back and scarred muscles.

    For me at this point, I’d need to abruptly buy a van and machine and get out of the Piggy, in order to transition to higher volumes. What stops that? I have no idea how to find work to support it or the confidence to step out. I guess you could say I am more defensively oriented in business than aggressive.

    In effect, I am still at stage 1 above, skilled, hardworking, but mystified as to how to make a lot of money with what I do.
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  19. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

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    Unless you've tweaked it, a lg #2 usually only goes to a max of 210f. which is about 99c. shouldn't be enough to melt a tool.
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  20. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

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    Not sure what it's like where you live Stephen but acquiring the right customers takes a lot of dogged persistence some times. Getting yourself, even an old beatup truckmount of some sort, (not too beat up, ya heer) will open more doors for you. It will enable you to consider jobs like restaurants, (which I hate doing) but you seem to be able to hire occasionally. Get someone trained, at least part time on the TM and look for commercial work that you haven't considered before. One of my most consistent money makers is smallish apartment building. 3-4 floors with stairs. I usually average $500-$700 each and there are tons of them around. You have to personally speak to the managers and convince them you are the best person for them. I am still a lot like you, by choice. I have never wanted a large company but as I get older, I realize I can't do it all by myself forever. There are lots of opportunities out there. If the Truck Mount is out of the question, try a Cimex and go after large cgd. Very profitable and chimp trainable as well.
    Old Coastie likes this.

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