Dark cherry wood stain on wool

1900 North

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Richard Swan
I’ve been asked to attempt to remove a 4 x 4 inch dark cherrywood furniture stain from a light colored wall to wall wool carpet, a few months after a minor flood. I haven’t offered the homeowner much hope. Beside cut and patch, what can be done? I have Pro’s Choice Stain Magic for wool, but everything seems like a real long shot. I’m more than happy to tell the customer the stain won’t budge and then walk away. Has anyone on the board had good success with a similar situation? Thanks!
 

Cleanworks

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I’ve been asked to attempt to remove a 4 x 4 inch dark cherrywood furniture stain from a light colored wall to wall wool carpet, a few months after a minor flood. I haven’t offered the homeowner much hope. Beside cut and patch, what can be done? I have Pro’s Choice Stain Magic for wool, but everything seems like a real long shot. I’m more than happy to tell the customer the stain won’t budge and then walk away. Has anyone on the board had good success with a similar situation? Thanks!
Pros choice has a procedure on their website. Take a look before you try anything.
 
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Nomad74

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Not really very hopeful. I would walk. You might be able to do the hours long process of uv light and plastic wrap but furniture stain is a hard one. Cobb claims to have some stuff that helps, but I haven’t had the luck with it as claimed.
 
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Jim Pemberton

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I’ve been asked to attempt to remove a 4 x 4 inch dark cherrywood furniture stain from a light colored wall to wall wool carpet, a few months after a minor flood. I haven’t offered the homeowner much hope. Beside cut and patch, what can be done? I have Pro’s Choice Stain Magic for wool, but everything seems like a real long shot. I’m more than happy to tell the customer the stain won’t budge and then walk away. Has anyone on the board had good success with a similar situation? Thanks!

If it were just a very small spot , I think you might have an even chance to remove it to your customer’s satisfaction. Dye stain removal, especially on wool, nearly always leaves behind some color difference (either bleached too light or some stain remaining). When it is the size of, say, a nickel, the surrounding natural color and the editing of the eye makes it barely noticeable.

4 x 4? I can’t see how they won’t still see it. Especially since they know it was there.

I can’t imagine it will be returned to the original appearance. Add to that the fact that most stain removal chemistry and procedures cause texture distortion as well.

If you can repair it with a donor piece, and if the damage isn’t in a high traffic area where the donor piece has different wear, you might have a shot.

In the end, what is the attempt worth to you, and to them?
 
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If it were just a very small spot , I think you might have an even chance to remove it to your customer’s satisfaction. Dye stain removal, especially on wool, nearly always leaves behind some color difference (either bleached too light or some stain remaining). When it is the size of, say, a nickel, the surrounding natural color and the editing of the eye makes it barely noticeable.

4 x 4? I can’t see how they won’t still see it. Especially since they know it was there.

I can’t imagine it will be returned to the original appearance. Add to that the fact that most stain removal chemistry and procedures cause texture distortion as well.

If you can repair it with a donor piece, and if the damage isn’t in a high traffic area where the donor piece has different wear, you might have a shot.

In the end, what is the attempt worth to you, and to them?

I have always liked Tony Wheelright's technique of taking the donor piece from the closet or such and distressing it to match the "wear/worn" look so it's not so eye catching.. He was a pretty sharp guy when you got to taking to him..
 

Jim Pemberton

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I have always liked Tony Wheelright's technique of taking the donor piece from the closet or such and distressing it to match the "wear/worn" look so it's not so eye catching.. He was a pretty sharp guy when you got to taking to him..

Tony isn't always remembered well here, but he taught me some very important technical procedures, and best of all, a thought about the advantages and disadvantages of in plant versus on location work:

"When you clean on location, time is your enemy. When you clean in plant, time is your friend"

I always give him credit for that idea.

Thanks for bringing him up Nate.
 

AdamDumphy

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ChemMax dye stripper might work. Could try to use a steamer and towel first to see if there is any color transfer. If there isn't any transfer id say patch or redye that area of the carpet. Stay away from anything over 9 PH and if you do use anything between 8-9 PH be sure to rinse it out right away. I clean Wool everyday and furniture stain is normally permanent.
 

roro

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These stains are problematic as sometimes it can be run-off from polishing oil. So for that reason if no donor carpet is available I would start with a solvent. After rinsing follow up with a tannin spotter, then if not successful to a stripper such as sodium bisulphite.
 
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Hack Attack

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These stains are problematic as sometimes it can be run-off from polishing oil. So for that reason if no donor carpet is available I would start with a solvent. After rinsing follow up with a tannin spotter, then if not successful to a stripper such as sodium bisulphite.
pretty much what I would do

I wouldnt consider patching if in good condition, as it's a legitimate insurance claim if unsuccessful
 

Hack Attack

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ChemMax dye stripper might work. Could try to use a steamer and towel first to see if there is any color transfer. If there isn't any transfer id say patch or redye that area of the carpet. Stay away from anything over 9 PH and if you do use anything between 8-9 PH be sure to rinse it out right away. I clean Wool everyday and furniture stain is normally permanent.
I've had a furniture stain...I ahem.. caused, couldnt budge it.
Next clean it rinsed straight out with normal prespray
 
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