I need a sharable photo of a rug with browning and bleed issues..

Mikey P

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Browning;
Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based rug fibers dry slowly. Sugars in the plant cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Sometimes confused with soil wicking.
Rug types that are prone to Browning should be cleaned in a Rug Washing facility, please consult your IICRC certified rug technician for assistance.


Color Bleeding
Rug dyes may move (bleed) during the cleaning process due to long-term exposure to moisture, animal urine, and high pH or pH buffered cleaning products.

In addition, some rug fibers are overdyed or the dyes are poorly set during the initial dye process. Pre-existing dye-bleed is often more pronounced on the back of a rug and should be a warning of potential problems for the cleaner. Pre-testing suspicious colors and rapid drying is critical to avoid permanent rug damage.

Safe “Low Moisture” options are available for light soil situations, consult with your IICRC Certified Rug Technician to see if they offer this service




Does anyone have a good example of either issue I can use for the App?
 

Nomad74

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Did you pit wash it or try and clean it with your wand?
That was pit washed. I ended up soaking it with acid rinse and drying it face down on a canvas tarp. I placed air movers on the back in an effort to reverse the wicking. It worked. I also sprayed the backing with peroxide as a post treatment which cleared it up more.
 
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Here is a bleeder for you... the after is going to cost you.

IMG_9244.jpg


They stored it in the basement and the faucet broke because of freezing and then they dragged it up the white steps. I got the rug looking like new the steps did not turn out as well.
 
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That was pit washed. I ended up soaking it with acid rinse and drying it face down on a canvas tarp. I placed air movers on the back in an effort to reverse the wicking. It worked. I also sprayed the backing with peroxide as a post treatment which cleared it up more.
Btw, if your trying to rid wool of yellow staining due to pet damage, you can use 3% peroxide. Soak the affected area, and put it in your drying room, do not rinse...Assessment after, if it has only moved 10-50%, retreat.... you can safely do it 3-4 times....
BUT ONLY USE 3% peroxide....
 

roro

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Browning;
Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based rug fibers dry slowly. Sugars in the plant cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Sometimes confused with soil wicking.
Rug types that are prone to Browning should be cleaned in a Rug Washing facility, please consult your IICRC certified rug technician for assistance.

What about browning from lignin?
 

Mikey P

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Browning;
Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based rug fibers dry slowly. Sugars in the plant cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Sometimes confused with soil wicking.
Rug types that are prone to Browning should be cleaned in a Rug Washing facility, please consult your IICRC certified rug technician for assistance.

What about browning from lignin?



Browning;

Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based rug fibers dry slowly. Sugars or Lignin in the plant fiber’s (Jute or Cotton) cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Sometimes confused with soil wicking.

Rug types that are prone to Browning should be cleaned in a Rug Washing facility as controlled or corrected when dry. Please consult your IICRC certified rug technician for assistance.
 

Mikey P

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I'll let the IICRC provide their own images for some of these..






Shrinkage:
Natural fiber area rugs may noticeably shrink or buckle after cleaning if certain materials used in the rug’s construction do not shrink uniformly. Some rugs are more prone than others to shrinkage and some rugs may shrink uniformly so you’ll most likely never notice. Cleaning method caution should be used to try to minimize over wetting, with a “Low Moisture” process being preferred, but some shrinkage may not be avoidable.
If cleaning your rug in your home is not worth the risk, ask your IICRC certified cleaner if they offer “In Plant” cleaning or can refer to a company that does.

















Edge Curl:
The sides of hand made rugs can curl because of excessive weft tension in the structure or lack of dimensional stability during the cleaning process. This is a weaving defect and can also happen from humidity in the house. Rugs that are prone to this should be cleaned in a controlled setting at a rug washing facility.
This condition is also very likely to happen with synthetic machine made rugs with cotton cord binding . On average, about 50% of the time the curling or ripples should be reduced or completely gone when the rug is dry.
If your synthetic rug did not dry flat, be patient, most take a few days to flatten out. If not you can try these tricks to help.
-Roll the rug up, starting face down, as tight as you can and hold it secure with rope or tape for a few days

-Use a clothes steamer (not an iron, too hot and can melt synthetic fibers real quick) to relax the edges and place a large heavy object on the raised areas for 24 hours. Make sure the object won't damage the rug by bleeding or rusting by using a plastic garbage bag as a barrier















On-location Cleaning:
It is recommended by the IICRC S100 Standard that the preferred system to clean area rugs is to remove them from a customer's house or business to be cleaned. It is understood that sometimes conditions dictate cleaning a rug on-location (size, price of cleaning vs value of the rug, customer not wanting rug to leave) and can be performed with caution. This should only be done by a specially trained technician using the proper method. Special attention to possible damage to the rug or floor needs to be followed and quick drying methods should be performed.

Care Tips:
-Rotate your rug once or twice a year to prevent uneven wear and fading.
-Flip your rug upside down and use a full size upright vacuum cleaner with a beater bar/brush roll to vibrate dry soil out of the fibers. Spend a good amount of time going over the rug from many directions. Be prepared to sweep or vacuum up what could be a considerable amount of dust if you live in a dry area or have pets.





























Fringe:
The ends of many rugs may be finished with cotton, synthetic or even silk fringe. This is part of the foundation of a hand-knotted rug and can be machine woven or sewn on to other rugs. Fringe is vulnerable to traffic wear, pet damage and aggressive vacuuming, and may have been weakened by bleach treatments in the manufacturing process or by improper cleaning. Always gently tug on a fringe to see if it comes off easily. If so, much of that fringe may be removed even with gentle cleaning.
It may be possible to touch up the fringe by hand when cleaning the rug in the home, please consult with your IICRC certified cleaning technician about your options

































Tufted Rug Off Gassing:

Hand-tufted rugs are held together using a latex adhesive. Many rugs will have an odor from day one and others will develop an odor over time due to impurities in the latex used. This is a manufacturing flaw and can’t be corrected by cleaning.
If the rug is new,the consumer should contact the retailer and ask to return the it

Tip: Tufted rugs usually have a five to ten year life span before the latex glue start to dry out and the rug starts to fail
When buying rugs, inspect the back and look for a visible reverse pattern of the front , this indicates no glue is being used to hold the rug together, thus ensuring a long lasting rug. This is true for both natural and synthetic fibers.












Browning;
Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based rug fibers dry slowly. Sugars or Lignin in the plant fiber’s (Jute or Cotton) cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Sometimes confused with soil wicking.

Rug types that are prone to Browning should be cleaned in a Rug Washing facility as controlled or corrected when dry. Please consult with your IICRC Rug Technician for assistance.











































Color Bleeding:

Rug dyes may move (bleed) during the cleaning process due to long-term exposure to moisture, animal urine, and high pH or pH buffered cleaning products.

In addition, some rug fibers are overdyed or the dyes are poorly set during the initial dye process. Pre-existing dye-bleed is often more pronounced on the back of a rug and should be a warning of potential problems for the cleaner. Pre-testing suspicious colors and rapid drying is critical to avoid permanent rug damage.

Safe “Low Moisture” options are available for light soil situations, consult with your IICRC Certified Cleaning Technician to see if they offer this service









Fabric Protector not Beading:
When “aftermarket” fiber protection products are applied to carpet and fabric, there can be an over abundance of the protective polymer sitting on top of the textile. This extra layer will break down over time but the individual fibers will still be coated/protected. Do not be alarmed if beads of liquid no longer sit on the surface of your carpet or upholstery fabric, your textile is still very resistant to permanent staining, soil and spots
Vacuuming, foot traffic and deep cleaning all have their effect on the initial break in on the fabric protection and over time will be the cause for the need to re-apply the protection, especially in high traffic areas.
 
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Got the monster done today, and 5 others...
The big one is taking up 4 bars.
I think I’m going to need another hr. or 2 on it....
I’ve got 10 more that need to be done. They are all scheduled to be returned this coming week.
Boo, guess I’m working 7 this week.....
 
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The Great Oz

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bryan
Mikey,
Not trying to write the blurbs, just offer information.
Shrinkage:
Some natural materials used to make are textiles may change in the presence of moisture. The fibers may swell, which causes the textile to "tighten" or shrink. Rugs are heavy-duty textiles, so will shrink to varying degrees depending on the fibers used in their construction.

A hand-knotted Oriental rug with a cotton foundation may shrink a little, and will relax or "grow" back to the original size after some use. Most wool foundation rugs offer no cleaning problems, but Afghani rugs may buckle so severely if washed that they can't be blocked flat, so should be avoided by anyone that isn't an experienced rug cleaner.

Depending on their construction, high plant-fiber content carpet and rugs and may shrink several inches and curl or buckle when cleaned with water.

Some plant fiber rugs can't be cleaned effectively using low-moisture methods and should be replaced if stained or heavily soiled.
Edge Curl:
The picture you have is what I'd call ripples. The cure is blocking, so I'm not sure those procedures will be helpful.

The edge curl that rug cleaners see is more like this: (rug is upside down)
rug curled under.jpg

or this:
rug curled up.jpg

The first is caused by uneven tension (weft is too tight) that might be temporarily fixed using a steamer/iron. The second is from people dragging their feet and might be temporarily fixed by rolling backward.


A wool rug that browned from alkaline washing, corrected with an acid rinse:
Not being critical Coastie, just looks like the floor has a similar browning issue. Maybe part of the first photo is a lighting or camera artifact?
 
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