I won't.

Mikey P

Administrator
Joined
Oct 6, 2006
Messages
93,679
Location
The High Chapperal
I entered this industry by going to work for one of, if not the most, unethical carpet cleaning companies ever to grace god’s green earth.

Miller’s Carpet Care, home and inventors of the Whole House $19.95 special.
While I learned that I loved the immediate gratification of the carpet cleaning process, as bad at it as I was, I also learned that I loved the on the go work day and dealing with customers one on one in their homes. My soft sell technique improved at a much faster rate than my portable equipped cleaning skills did.

My conscience led to me buying my first premium cleaner tool, the good ol 175. It helped me sell and perform the “Deep Preconditioning” step that my fellow Miller’s techs were using a Grandi Groomer or better yet, their shoes, to perform.

My 175 helped me sleep at night.

Every carpet no matter it’s condition needed preconditioning if you wanted to succeed at Millers, or A1 or Zzzz Best or any of the other bait and switch companies that were so popular at the time.
I lasted a whole year, which was rare, before moving to northern California to work for Coit Services. Where you damn well better be selling many other services if you wanted to live that glamorous Truck Mounted Super Technician lifestyle.

It was with Coit that I learned about the pit falls of over selling carpet cleaning add on services and how they affect your repeat rate. If you sell (but don’t perform yourself) an observant homeowner on (portable) HVAC cleaning, wood floor sanding, drapery cleaning, mini blind cleaning, stone polishing and all the other typical bullet points our industry tries to thrive on, you could count on never seeing them again. The commissioned lifestyle does not support the time it takes to perform these types of services properly, especially when those specialty techs were also encouraged (forced) to upsell even more services in order to survive.
It was with Coit that I got my first Water Claw and started to sell deep urine treatments, but it wasn’t until I started my own mom and pop that I actually lifted a contaminated carpet that had been “clawed” and I realized what a disgusting mess the clawing process makes of anything but a one time piddle by a Tea Cup Poodle.

With Coit I also learned about selling fabric protection ON EVERY job, but it took a took the accountability of being a small town owner operator to realize how over selling protector affects one’s repeat rate. Most never see the benefit and many wont call you back for misleading them.

I learned a lot in those 14 years as a tech who never had to worry about how to make the phone ring. Now 21 years in as an owner op, I continue to learn more about myself and what I will and wont do to make a buck.

I won’t sell urine treatments. I’ll clean the living hell out of a contaminated carpet but no promises are made or charged for.

I won’t sell sanitizing of any sort, if good ol’ hot water, scrubbing and a high alkaline detergent doesn’t kill the cooties, I want no part of promising otherwise. And no, line item “application of a sanitizer” does not get you off the morality hook.

I won’t use a low moisture process when kids and pets are involved.

I won’t apply topical sealers to make a dull floor shiny just because the customer bought the wrong floor.

I won’t sell protector to polyester owners.

I won’t not do a dry stroke.

And as a person in a position of influence in the carpet cleaning community, I won’t promote or sell tools, chemistry or services that I or people I really trust (which are very few) haven’t used themselves for an extended period of time.

And just to stir the pot, I’m at the point where I won’t subject homeowners to the trails and tribulations of having their carpet pressure washed just to remove a few coffee and wine stains when an oscillating microfiber bonnet will do the job….

I am an anomaly.
 

Radar Foster

Mr Personality
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Messages
12,500
Location
.
Name
The Dude
I heard that the disgraced owner of Miller’s is now an Uber driver and tries to sell his riders hand sanitizer and wipes with his premium ride package
 
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Radar Foster

Mr Personality
Joined
Oct 9, 2006
Messages
12,500
Location
.
Name
The Dude
Fred should let Sonny back on MB for a day and tag his a$$ on this thread

phred needs a new chew toy
 

Cherokee

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2015
Messages
254
Location
Cherokee Village, Arkansas
Name
Matt Middleton
I entered this industry by going to work for one of, if not the most, unethical carpet cleaning companies ever to grace god’s green earth.

Miller’s Carpet Care, home and inventors of the Whole House $19.95 special.
While I learned that I loved the immediate gratification of the carpet cleaning process, as bad at it as I was, I also learned that I loved the on the go work day and dealing with customers one on one in their homes. My soft sell technique improved at a much faster rate than my portable equipped cleaning skills did.

My conscience led to me buying my first premium cleaner tool, the good ol 175. It helped me sell and perform the “Deep Preconditioning” step that my fellow Miller’s techs were using a Grandi Groomer or better yet, their shoes, to perform.

My 175 helped me sleep at night.

Every carpet no matter it’s condition needed preconditioning if you wanted to succeed at Millers, or A1 or Zzzz Best or any of the other bait and switch companies that were so popular at the time.
I lasted a whole year, which was rare, before moving to northern California to work for Coit Services. Where you damn well better be selling many other services if you wanted to live that glamorous Truck Mounted Super Technician lifestyle.

It was with Coit that I learned about the pit falls of over selling carpet cleaning add on services and how they affect your repeat rate. If you sell (but don’t perform yourself) an observant homeowner on (portable) HVAC cleaning, wood floor sanding, drapery cleaning, mini blind cleaning, stone polishing and all the other typical bullet points our industry tries to thrive on, you could count on never seeing them again. The commissioned lifestyle does not support the time it takes to perform these types of services properly, especially when those specialty techs were also encouraged (forced) to upsell even more services in order to survive.
It was with Coit that I got my first Water Claw and started to sell deep urine treatments, but it wasn’t until I started my own mom and pop that I actually lifted a contaminated carpet that had been “clawed” and I realized what a disgusting mess the clawing process makes of anything but a one time piddle by a Tea Cup Poodle.

With Coit I also learned about selling fabric protection ON EVERY job, but it took a took the accountability of being a small town owner operator to realize how over selling protector affects one’s repeat rate. Most never see the benefit and many wont call you back for misleading them.

I learned a lot in those 14 years as a tech who never had to worry about how to make the phone ring. Now 21 years in as an owner op, I continue to learn more about myself and what I will and wont do to make a buck.

I won’t sell urine treatments. I’ll clean the living hell out of a contaminated carpet but no promises are made or charged for.

I won’t sell sanitizing of any sort, if good ol’ hot water, scrubbing and a high alkaline detergent doesn’t kill the cooties, I want no part of promising otherwise. And no, line item “application of a sanitizer” does not get you off the morality hook.

I won’t use a low moisture process when kids and pets are involved.

I won’t apply topical sealers to make a dull floor shiny just because the customer bought the wrong floor.

I won’t sell protector to polyester owners.

I won’t not do a dry stroke.

And as a person in a position of influence in the carpet cleaning community, I won’t promote or sell tools, chemistry or services that I or people I really trust (which are very few) haven’t used themselves for an extended period of time.

And just to stir the pot, I’m at the point where I won’t subject homeowners to the trails and tribulations of having their carpet pressure washed just to remove a few coffee and wine stains when an oscillating microfiber bonnet will do the job….

I am an anomaly.
Well I too are abbie normal.
 
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Papa John

Lifetime Supportive Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2013
Messages
4,736
Location
San Francisco, CA.
Name
John Stewart
You had me until you "stirred the Pot".
Coffee or wine removal always seemed to be less successful or Took longer to perform when I cut corners.

Recently a customer asked as I was setting up my 370 tm-- "Is all this necessary, don't you have a smaller machine?"
"I do, and It would be simpler, but I tend to be more successful when I use this more powerful machine. I'm not going to cut any corners and I'm going to take the- Show no mercy, take no prisoners' approach- towards removing those spots."

She laughed and said Thank you very much.
 
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Numero Uno

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2006
Messages
1,088
Location
Ma
Name
Caesar
Our past's define our present.
You needed all that to become what you are now...
All of us in our own ways went through similar.
You got big feet bud,takes a big man to fill em.
Carry on...
 

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