Looking for help writing up water mitigation invoice for insurance company

absolute

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Aug 10, 2022
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Austin
Name
Katie Alexander
Hey guys- this is our 1st water mitigation job dealing with an insurance company. I was hoping to get some help with writing it up properly without Xactimate. It's just a small catagory 1 type flood, but figured we need to use this one as a time to learn how to properly invoice. So much info on the web i'm getting overwhelmed. We know how & what to bill for a normal flood damage restoration cleanup when billing the customer (apartment complex's ect) but this is our 1st time working with a customer who is filing a claim through their insurance. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 

BIG WOOD

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Matt w.
Good friend I grew up just started his own Estimating business. He's over 15years experienced with Xactimate and he does all my water mitigation jobs with Xactimate

Ryan Mitchell
Mitchell Estimating Services
706-614-8857

My water mitigation invoices have doubled since I got him doing my invoicing.
 

absolute

Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2022
Messages
3
Location
Austin
Name
Katie Alexander
Good friend I grew up just started his own Estimating business. He's over 15years experienced with Xactimate and he does all my water mitigation jobs with Xactimate

Ryan Mitchell
Mitchell Estimating Services
706-614-8857

My water mitigation invoices have doubled since I got him doing my invoicing.
Thank you!
 
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kmdineen

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Redding, CT
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Kevin Dineen
Get the insurance company name and claim number and the adjusters' name and contact information.



Insurance companies also like to have pictures of the job, equipment in action, and the cause of the loss such as a broken water pipe.



A signed customer authorization form and a signed customer satisfaction form.



A W-9 form.



Ask the insurance company to pay you directly.
 

BIG WOOD

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Georgia
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Matt w.
Get the insurance company name and claim number and the adjusters' name and contact information.



Insurance companies also like to have pictures of the job, equipment in action, and the cause of the loss such as a broken water pipe.



A signed customer authorization form and a signed customer satisfaction form.



A W-9 form.



Ask the insurance company to pay you directly.
I’m not a big fan of asking the insurance to pay directly. That gives them full access to shaving off costs on your invoice that they feel aren’t needed. That’s why it’s good to bill the customer and have a section on your work authorization that they pay all of your costs, even if the insurance company doesn’t pay the full bill.
 
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kmdineen

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Redding, CT
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Kevin Dineen
I’m not a big fan of asking the insurance to pay directly. That gives them full access to shaving off costs on your invoice that they feel aren’t needed. That’s why it’s good to bill the customer and have a section on your work authorization that they pay all of your costs, even if the insurance company doesn’t pay the full bill.
There are pros and cons to being paid by the homeowner or the insurance company. Insurance companies WILL pay all reasonable costs to dry the insured's structure. Insurance companies have money on hand to pay any bill regardless of the amount. If the insurance company refuses to pay for an item on your invoice, a call to the homeowner explaining they will be responsible for what the insurance company won’t pay will resolve this problem quickly.



Most homeowners can’t or won’t pay you several thousand dollars of their own money at the completion of your job so you have to wait for them to get paid by the insurance company anyway, then hopefully pay you.



I prefer dealing with an insurance company that thinks paying $5000.00 to $50,000.00 of company money is all in a day's work to a homeowner thinking there is no way you deserve all this money.
 

absolute

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Austin
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Katie Alexander
W
I’m not a big fan of asking the insurance to pay directly. That gives them full access to shaving off costs on your invoice that they feel aren’t needed. That’s why it’s good to bill the customer and have a section on your work authorization that they pay all of your costs, even if the insurance company doesn’t pay the full bill.
We had the customer sign all of the necessary forms, took plenty of pics and plan to bill the home owner not the insurance company- the can work that out between themselves. Thanks for the advice!
 

SMRBAP

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Pittsburgh PA
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Anthony
Scope (Note cat, class, affected areas, what was demo'd and justification for demo)

I know you are asking for info to invoice, but in this world, this is all part of the invoicing.

Work Auth

Affected Photos (showing damaged areas before anything is done)

Completed Photos (showing all work completed to point of equipment)

Equipment Photos (show ever single piece installed)

Dry Logs (This is where most people lose the battle)
Your dry logs need to show the drying progress from start to finish.
Every affected material has an initial reading, and each day it should decrease towards the dry standard reading you've procured out of that structure.

You should be taking air readings. RH/T/GPP, for; Outside air, Unaffected area, Each drying chamber, each dehu output (to get GDEP).

Your chambers should be at or below 40Rh within 24 hrs. Unattained you'll get pushback (and something is wrong with your drying plan).

You should maintain at least 4-5 GDEP to maintain justification of dehumidification.

You also need to justify your equipment.
You can't justify an XXL Dehu (160PPD or >) on a Class 1 loss that only needed 24PPD.
You can't justify 16 airmovers on that same loss that calcs would rec 6-8 for.
This is either going to be hard math you should provide by the IICRC calcs, or use a drying app such as MICA.

Most class 1 are dry in 2-3 days. If its going to 5 or longer, expect pushback without serious justification. Most class 2 are 2-4 days. Most class 3 are 3-5 days. Prepare to justify most times you go over 5.

Certificate of completion/satisfaction (signed by insured)

Xactimate is the standard. Either price by it or expect pushback in the majority of cases.
If you are planning on doing more than a handful of water losses annually - get and learn Xactimate. Anyone can be proficient inside a few days armed with their entry book/coursework and a few example estimates donated by someone to you.

Steer clear of Symbility - it's 20-35% under Xact pricing.
 
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