Should proper usage and cautions of "over the counter" Oxidizers be mentioned in the S100?

Mikey P

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During a chapter review session this morning it was brought up that perhaps a paragraph or two should be added to address the ever growning trend of Oxy Clean, Sally's, pool and farm supply type Oxidizers.

Techniques for industry specific usage is found elsewhere in the S100 but the committee felt a mention in regards to safety and responsibilities should get some space here:

2.3.2.2 Reduction and Oxidation



It is recommended that cleaning technicians understand that reduction and oxidation is a process in which one substance loses electrons (oxidation) and another gains those electrons (reduction). This may be, but is not always, the result of oxygen moving from one molecule to another. Oxidation and reduction happen together. One substance is oxidized when another is reduced.



A substance that removes oxygen from another substance is referred to as a reducer. A substance that adds oxygen to another substance is referred to as an oxidizer. In cleaning, oxidizers and reducers are referred to as bleaches. There are many types of bleaches, some of which may whiten, brighten or remove color. Some bleaches kill microorganisms and thus eliminate odors.



Bleaches are common ingredients in dye-stain removers. Milder types can be additives to detergents.

Oxidizers gain strength from absorbing UV light. Reactions may gain strength from heat. Fading due to ozone or fumes are examples of redox reactions.



Cleaning technicians shouldmake sure that oxidizers and reducers are never mixed together. The reaction is likely to be dangerous and release a significant amount of heat


________________________________

Everyone other than Marty is welcomed to contribute what they feel would be appropriate.

Tech friendly, succinct and void of Canadian humor would be appreciated.
 
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Jim Pemberton

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This is a good idea.

What needs to be understood is that these products, whether (horrors) they are bought in the grocery store or beauty salon, or bought as "formulated products" from suppliers ALL have risks in their use.

The old "use a product with product liability back up" line really doesn't cut it with strong bleaches and reducers, as no manufacturer is going to stand behind you if you take color out of silk, cotton, viscose, wool, nylon, or polyester (some people still think polyester is "bleach proof"....) when these products are used in the course of stain removal.

So a comment reminding cleaners that the use of color altering products is risky, and that the customer has to be informed of these risks before you put on your "Superman Cape" and try to remove difficult stains, would be in order.

Some of the chemistry stuff could be summarized more simply, or eliminated.

The risks and liability issues are more important to discuss.
 

ruff

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Or to rephrase Jim:
  1. Control your urge to be a stain removal hero.
  2. If you can't control that urge, discuss with client, help them practice their release of liability signing talent.
  3. Cause, it ain't your problem till you make it yours.
  4. Apply these principals throughout your daily practice. Achtung baby!
 
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Cleanworks

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I would recommend discussing industry accepted products. Although I use some of them, things like Sally's volume 40 or oxyclean are not carpet cleaning products. In the hands of a knowledgeable technician, they can do wonders. In the hands of a novice, it's a disaster waiting to happen. A discussion on customer usage and problems that can result would be appropriate.
 
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Matt Wood

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I think you should stress the importance of downloading the SDS of that over the counter product to see exactly what the active ingredients are. For example, the swimming pool peroxide that's over the counter never says hydrogen peroxide specifically on the name of the product. They might think they have a oxidizer, when they really bought a chlorine product.
 
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randy

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Or to rephrase Jim:
  1. Control your urge to be a stain removal hero
  2. Cause, it ain't your problem till you make it yours
These two should be mentioned in the warning.
 

Andy

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One sentence in capitalized bold print. Store bought oxidizers and reducers should not be used.
 

Brian H

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During a chapter review session this morning it was brought up that perhaps a paragraph or two should be added to address the ever growning trend of Oxy Clean, Sally's, pool and farm supply type Oxidizers.

Techniques for industry specific usage is found elsewhere in the S100 but the committee felt a mention in regards to safety and responsibilities should get some space here:

2.3.2.2 Reduction and Oxidation



It is recommended that cleaning technicians understand that reduction and oxidation is a process in which one substance loses electrons (oxidation) and another gains those electrons (reduction). This may be, but is not always, the result of oxygen moving from one molecule to another. Oxidation and reduction happen together. One substance is oxidized when another is reduced.



A substance that removes oxygen from another substance is referred to as a reducer. A substance that adds oxygen to another substance is referred to as an oxidizer. In cleaning, oxidizers and reducers are referred to as bleaches. There are many types of bleaches, some of which may whiten, brighten or remove color. Some bleaches kill microorganisms and thus eliminate odors.



Bleaches are common ingredients in dye-stain removers. Milder types can be additives to detergents.

Oxidizers gain strength from absorbing UV light. Reactions may gain strength from heat. Fading due to ozone or fumes are examples of redox reactions.



Cleaning technicians shouldmake sure that oxidizers and reducers are never mixed together. The reaction is likely to be dangerous and release a significant amount of heat
99% of people who start to read that will not make it through the entire description. (Yes, I include myself in that 99%) I think I made it a bit more readable, though I am not that familiar with the chemistry behind oxidation and reduction.

"Cleaning technicians need to understand that reduction and oxidation is a process in which one substance loses electrons (oxidation) and another gains those electrons (reduction). One substance is oxidized when another is reduced. A substance that removes oxygen from another substance is referred to as a reducer. A substance that adds oxygen to another substance is referred to as an oxidizer.

In cleaning, oxidizers and reducers are often referred to as bleaches. There are many types of bleaches, some of which may whiten, brighten or remove color. Certain oxidizers and reducers also kill microorganisms and are used in eliminating odors. They are also common ingredients in dye-stain removers with milder types being used as additives to detergents.

In addition, oxidizers gain strength from absorbing UV light. Reactions may also gain strength from heat. A common example of of oxidation/reduction (redox) reaction is fading due to ozone or fumes as seen in front of sliding glass doors.

Oxidizers and reducers should NEVER be mixed together. The reaction is likely to be VERY dangerous and release an undesirable amount of heat. "
 

Hack Attack

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One sentence in capitalized bold print. Store bought oxidizers and reducers should not be used.
hmm I can buy 20 litres of 50% tech grade hydrogen peroxide for $100..

or 10 litres of 6% hydrogen peroxide from a cleaning distributor.. what to do!?

I mix all my own oxidisers and reducers from raw product
 

Cleanworks

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hmm I can buy 20 litres of 50% tech grade hydrogen peroxide for $100..

or 10 litres of 6% hydrogen peroxide from a cleaning distributor.. what to do!?

I mix all my own oxidisers and reducers from raw product
That's great. For you. You should take a color repair course, then let your competitors know that you use 50 percent peroxide as a spotter.
 
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Should proper usage and cautions of "over the counter" Oxidizers be mentioned in the S100?


haven't seen an s100 in 30 years
and don't remember how or what was written in it

so I have to ask...
In the basic chemistry parts , are the different types of oxidizers mentioned ?
if so, what's the difference or the need to mention "OTC" peroxides, ammonias, bisulfides, sod-perc, etc?

if the use and cautions of the raw ingredients and their effects are covered, shouldn't matter whether the counter was Sally's, Cobbs, ProChem or Chemstore.com to a "certified " trained professional , right???

..L.T.A.
 

FredC

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why does this need to be in this section

why not just an advisory against the use of using products not specifically labeled for carpet cleaning, chemistry experiments etc......in the beginning of the book


and warnings in this section should deal with the warning/dangers/problems of using oxidizers/reducers specifically
 

Loren Egland

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One sentence in capitalized bold print. Store bought oxidizers and reducers should not be used.
I didn’t have any carpet cleaning oxidizer so I went to Sally’s last week to pick up some 40 volume clear hydrogen peroxide developer to try to fix the stain on popcorn ceiling from a leak in the upstairs bathroom over the dinette. Clorox didn’t doo much but a couple applications if hp did the trick.C8866F31-97B3-4FC7-AED2-ED1B502E846C.jpeg3A0F163C-7AEF-4492-BD36-6F2F5FE50F85.jpeg
 

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