Changes in behavior since 1984

#2
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I watch this before, and I totally agree. Thats why i am endeavoring to creat or promote an environment that my son can have a purpose with minimal depresssion. Hard work, communication skills etc... I hope i do well.
 
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#5
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I wouldn't say that none of the blame falls on the millennials themselves

same here
where I disagree is the

"it's not yo fault" is too much of an excuse for continued fail
It's not your fault if parents raised you wrong
It IS your fault once an adult to not make it a personal responsibility to recognize and work on one's flaws that cause major problems .
Not continue to satiate them with dopamine




and it's the responsibility of corp America to fix them????:headscratch:
where their parents failed?
(or the millennials themselves that continue to fail???)


he lost me big time on those points

..L.T.A.
 
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#6
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I agree. A large percent of millennials don't work for corporations, and never will. They can choose to succeed too. It is sad how technology has been used to our detriment. After my teenage years I haven't used social media. It promotes egotism, low self esteem, self centered attitudes, and mostly it's a waste of time. More parents should see this video.
 
#7
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Every generation complained and did not think very highly of the one that came after it.
Every generation has different characteristics (bad, good and in between) and parents try to compensate their kids for what they "supposedly" did not get. And in the process create new advantages and deficiencies.

Somehow, civilization, so far, survived this "decline" and thrived. I think we'll be all right.
 
#8
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omehow, civilization, so far, survived this "decline"

sorta kinda
History shows all great civilizations rose, peaked and declined and another took it's place to repeat the cycle

I'd do agree most see the generation(s) after theirs as "less than"
There could be some truth to that

I don't think it's because of Elvis, the Beetles or rap
(or hi-tec devises as he suggests is the "new Elvis" that rots the youth of today)
But I do see evidence we are in the "decline" side as far as great civilizations go



..L.T.A.
 
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You're thinking the US. Decline of empires. And yes I would agree that the US is on the decline.
Millennial are not limited to the US. They have them in the west as well as in the east.
 
#12
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Every generation complained and did not think very highly of the one that came after it.
Every generation has different characteristics (bad, good and in between) and parents try to compensate their kids for what they "supposedly" did not get. And in the process create new advantages and deficiencies.

Somehow, civilization, so far, survived this "decline" and thrived. I think we'll be all right.
Agree

Every generation seems to look back and recall a better time

Was pretty rascist and intolerant where I grew up, and there were plenty of lazy and disrespectful kids as well

Times, technologies and people evolve ... change is good
 
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With all the tech in our child's lives now a days, I feel like most kids have the attention span of a nat(tiny bug if ya don't know).

I see a day in the future where everything will be done by service providers. These kids will be able to write computer programs in minutes, but won't be able to change a light bulb! They are going to have to pay for everything, because they know how to do nothing(except computer stuff).

I also see a day coming(and it's already starting) that young people wont leave the house(or socialize). Really, everything can be shipped right to the front door(tp, soap, food, etc.) and it's only going to get worse.

20 years from now ALL kids will know how to code, they will all(want to) work some type of programming job and no one will want to be service providers, construction workers, etc.

I see a very large shortage of people who actually work coming, assuming I live long enough to see it....
 
#23
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I agree with Larry.. :eekk: :lol:.

I thought I had attention efficiency syndrome, until my Dad showed me his belt! My mom was good at using motherly guilt. Lol.

I should have used a belt, but after a hard day at work, I perfected to hug my kids instead of disciplining them. This may have been a mistake-- now I see that I may have to employ tough love tactics to get my 30 year old son to grow up!
 
#24
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I agree with Larry.. :eekk: :lol:.

I thought I had attention efficiency syndrome, until my Dad showed me his belt! My mom was good at using motherly guilt. Lol.

I should have used a belt, but after a hard day at work, I perfected to hug my kids instead of disciplining them. This may have been a mistake-- now I see that I may have to employ tough love tactics to get my 30 year old son to grow up!
Don't beat yourself up John - Life is too precious, love them for who they are, encourage them to be the best "insert name" they can. At age 30 he knows what he wants, it just may not be what you want for him. Everyone has options some take advantage of them and some don't. As that famous philosopher Rodney K from the streets of LA once said: "Can't we just all get a long?" :confusedd: I'm going through it now with my oldest! Loves me but just starting to see signs that he respects me.
 
#27
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I should have used a belt, but after a hard day at work, I perfected to hug my kids instead of disciplining them

discipline yes
but only two instances of corporal punishment with my kids.
One at 7 when I caught my son in a bold faced lie ...and gave him every opportunity to fess up
and once when my daughter was 5 or 6 and tried to stuff the cat in the microwave :eekk:

they've both grown up adults now
One's a professional con man and the other is a serial killer...
hmmm.....maybe I shudda wupped 'em more .:shifty::shifty::icon_razz::lol::lol:


seriously, once a kid reaches somewhere between 13 and 15, you're done.
cause other than restricting them if they're still in the home, not a hell of a lot you can do when/if they don't want to go along with the program

"tough love"....
John was 16 (?) when he thought he was man enough to tell me he didn't have to go along with my program .
I was pretty calm about it and said,

"well son, what you're telling me is you're a full grown man now ready to move out on your own.
That's what you'll have to do, because this is my home and my rules"

he knew I was serious (I was) , and decided my program wasn't "all that bad"


with adult children "tough love" means not enabling them to make poor choices.
The most common enabling is in the form of $ub$idizing lack of personal responsibility and/or allowing/tolerating, minimizing or rationalizing their personally destructive behavior

Truth is, very, VERY few people change unless/until they're forced too and/or have no other options
"enabling = options"


Dr Fill


..L.T.A.
 
#28
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discipline yes
but only two instances of corporal punishment with my kids.
One at 7 when I caught my son in a bold faced lie ...and gave him every opportunity to fess up
and once when my daughter was 5 or 6 and tried to stuff the cat in the microwave :eekk:

they've both grown up adults now
One's a professional con man and the other is a serial killer...
hmmm.....maybe I shudda wupped 'em more .:shifty::shifty::icon_razz::lol::lol:


seriously, once a kid reaches somewhere between 13 and 15, you're done.
cause other than restricting them if they're still in the home, not a hell of a lot you can do when/if they don't want to go along with the program

"tough love"....
John was 16 (?) when he thought he was man enough to tell me he didn't have to go along with my program .
I was pretty calm about it and said,

"well son, what you're telling me is you're a full grown man now ready to move out on your own.
That's what you'll have to do, because this is my home and my rules"

he knew I was serious (I was) , and decided my program wasn't "all that bad"


with adult children "tough love" means not enabling them to make poor choices.
The most common enabling is in the form of $ub$idizing lack of personal responsibility and/or allowing/tolerating, minimizing or rationalizing their personally destructive behavior

Truth is, very, VERY few people change unless/until they're forced too and/or have no other options
"enabling = options"


Dr Fill


..L.T.A.
Thank you for caring enough to write all that---
Love your words of wisdom. :biggrin:
 
#30
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d.........
"tough love"....
John was 16 (?) when he thought he was man enough to tell me he didn't have to go along with my program .
I was pretty calm about it and said,

"well son, what you're telling me is you're a full grown man now ready to move out on your own.
That's what you'll have to do, because this is my home and my rules"

he knew I was serious (I was) , and decided my program wasn't "all that bad"
..L.T.A.
I didn't realize John (vegie) was your son.
Considering all, you done a good Job Capi :winky:
 
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