Cleaning a classic wool

Discussion in 'the CleAn Room' started by Hack Attack, Jun 6, 2018.

  1. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    I see about 3-4 of these a year, this is in old farmhouse. Hand sewn joins, and all about a meter apart
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  2. Old Coastie
    Old Coastie

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    Aha! So THAT is what you do with spare sheep!
  3. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

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    That's not all they do with them.
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  4. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    the rest get bbq'd :smile:
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  5. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    I'm not au fait on my floral designs but thats got to be a 50's design at least, showing wear but still useable buy quality not poly
  6. scottw
    scottw

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    Had that in my home when I was a child. Definitely 1950s. The classic width was 27".
  7. Cleanworks
    Cleanworks

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    We still see some rugs sewn like that. Wonder if they are just bound pieces of what was once wall to wall carpet.
  8. scottw
    scottw

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    In that era, there was little or no broadloom carpet. Looms to weave the carpet were narrow. Wall-to-wall carpet was the result of sewing several strip or 27" wide carpet together rather than the reverse of making strips from a wider carpet.
  9. Doug Cox
    Doug Cox

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    LOL!!
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  10. The Great Oz
    The Great Oz

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    If there's a bump at each seam, the narrow-loom (as apposed to broadloom) goods were sewn together using a machine called a hurdygurdy. It bent the edges down and sewed them together, creating a hump that wore out before the rest of the carpet. That there is no wear showing means this carpet gets little use.

    PS: The very best old Wilton rugs were made this way, and are very collectible now.
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  11. Hack Attack
    Hack Attack

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    these have become semi collectable with some interior designers here, they seperate the joins and get the edges bound and sell them as hall runners
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  12. Harry Myers
    Harry Myers

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    I handsaw 3/4 yd carpet when a customer wants it. If the hand sewed seams looks like real shit then the hurdy hurdy was used. I would be concerned if it was seamed together using tape. Hand sewed should not be a problem.
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  13. Old Coastie
    Old Coastie

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    Ye ken whit clypes thon sheepies be, but!

    —every Scot ever
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  14. roro
    roro

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    From http://www.carpet-rug.org/history-of-carpet.html
    "In 1839, Erastus Bigelow permanently reshaped the industry with the invention of the power loom for weaving carpets. Bigelow's loom, which doubled carpet production the first year after its creation and tripled it by 1850, is now part of the Smithsonian Institution's collections. He continued to devote his life to innovation -- 35 separate patents were issued to him between 1839 and 1876. Bigelow introduced the first broadloom carpet in 1877."
  15. scottw
    scottw

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    At that time, a standard loom was no more than 1 arm span wide. This allowed one weaver to pass the shuttle through from one side of the loom to the other. Standard looms could be as wide as 5'. Anything wider than about 5' was considered broadloom. This was fabric and not carpet. It required one person on each side of the loom to pass the shuttle back and forth.

    The flying shuttle introduced in 1733 allowed to production of broadloom fabric with only one person operating the loom. This increased the production of broadloom fabric.

    Carpet looms continued to be 27" to 36" wide until Bigelow's invention. Carpet could then be up to 6' wide. This was still a minority of the carpet production.

    There is no widely accept definition of how wide fabric or carpet must be to qualify as "broadloom." By the 1960's broadloomed carpet usually meant 12' wide.
  16. roro
    roro

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    http://www.carpetinfo.co.uk/all_about_carpet/history_of_carpet.htm
    Some interesting facts and dates here. Up until about 10 years ago we were still cleaning Brinton a real quality carpet made for the pub trade in narrow lengths hand-sewed at the seams. I was told that they were made in the narrow width as if woven in broadloom the weight was too great for the looms.We still get the occasional Axminster or Wilton which are always a pleasure to clean

    roro

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