Glycol and the modern cleaner

MicahR

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Oct 16, 2006
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Billings, MT
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Micah Richardson
Have an issue that I was hoping to get some guidance on. Have around 600sq.ft. that is effected by a glycol from a boiler unit for hot water heat. I've done an initial rinse with an acid detergent (Flex Ice) while extracting. I knew I'd have to go back and clean again. My intial thought was just to use a normal traffic lane cleaner (Ultrapac), agitate it in with my cimex and rinse. Thought about spiking it with some 99% isopropyl.

Anyone ran across this before? If so what did you find effective? Really don't want to have to go back again if possible.
 

MicahR

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Billings, MT
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Micah Richardson
I thought about just using degrease all since I have a bit of that. Or Prochem's wide range cleaner. Then I wondered if I was overthinking it as well and figured a good traffic lane cleaner might work the best.
 

Desk Jockey

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I thought about just using degrease all since I have a bit of that. Or Prochem's wide range cleaner. Then I wondered if I was overthinking it as well and figured a good traffic lane cleaner might work the best.
If you're going to clean it and you're not worried about removing any stain resistantcy, I'd use Prochem's Ultrapac Renovate. Great product and free rinsing.

I would only clean it if they release you of any liability. I'd have concerns with what degree of efficacy I could deliver. The possibility of leaving a contaminate that could be a health hazard or could attract soil isn't something I'd be comfortable with.

I'd estimate removal of carpet & cushion as well as pressure washing the floor.
 
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Desk Jockey

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I told ya we’d make it complicated
Stockwell will be here soon
If insured, I would think most companies would see liability in trying to salvage something like this. Kids laying on it, homeowner walking on it barefoot are at risk of skin irritation unless its completely removed. How can you remove it completely and prove you did. The risk isn't worth the reward.
 

Hack Attack

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If insured, I would think most companies would see liability in trying to salvage something like this. Kids laying on it, homeowner walking on it barefoot are at risk of skin irritation unless its completely removed. How can you remove it completely and prove you did. The risk isn't worth the reward.
dont try and make me feel guilty for one I did last year
 
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Jeff T
600 sqft? Replace. No way your going to get it all out.
It is a bottom up mess, it’s seeped and saturated every nook and cranny in the room, and, the underlay is saturated....

picture this; go to the auto parts store, buy 20 gallons of radiator fluid, dump it all over an equal sized area (20 X 30’ room), and try to remove that....

Cause that’s what your dealing with....
 
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