high end customer wants a rug made of linen, silk and wool cleaned in her home

Papa John

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I would have no reservations about cleaning this rug on location if it was just wool. I would prefer to clean in my plant where I have more control, but there are very large and the customers wants them cleaned in place.
Its the linen content that worries me the most.
I'm thinking of using absorbent compound instead of HWE.-- the recent CleanFax article on the subject sparked my interest.
Or maybe HWE with wand set at low pressure and low flow;
with either method I would vacuum in multiple directions and passes.

any recommendations is appreciated.
 

Cleanworks

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Do a burn test first to see if it is real silk or viscose. An easy way to do this is to take a clean carding brush and brush up some fibre. I have a similar situation with 2-20ftx24ft viscose rugs that I clean in home. I use Prochems fine fabric prespray with cold water, then rinse with cold water at 200 psi and reduced vacuum with a glided 2 inch wand. I do a lot of repeated dry strokes all in the same direction. Lightly groom with a brush.
 

Desk Jockey

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Rather than assume the risk, dry compound with do a decent job of freshening it up. I'd be concerned about texture change cleaning silk on location with little control.
 

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I would be using my shark vacuum with out suction to agitate the powder in. I sold my brush pro and wouldnt want to use the cimex on this rug.
 
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Papa John

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I came highly recommended to this client by her architect who is also a longtime customer line.
Do I owe it to her to disclose that I won't be using my normal system?
 

Cleanworks

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I came highly recommended to this client by her architect who is also a longtime customer line.
Do I owe it to her to disclose that I won't be using my normal system?
No. You are the professional. You will inspect the rug and choose the optimal system. At her risk only. These rugs are created by designers with no thought as to how to clean them.
 

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I've been thinking about the cleaning of wool rugs with compounds for the last few weeks. I just don't think it's the way to go. Wool has cuticles and it really should be dusted properly. I would think the compound would also get caught in the cuticles. The compound over time would also travel to the backing, later causing dry rot. This is where the customer needs to be educated into letting you take it offsite to clean it right. Dust it, clean the wool, us an upholstery tool on the linens and silks if super fragile. Low heat, low pressure. If something goes wrong, you have time to fix it if you are in a controlled environment.

We can get away with high heat, high suction, High pH, and high flow on carpets, but natural fibers on rugs are different. Anyway, just my thoughts.
 

Papa John

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I've been thinking about the cleaning of wool rugs with compounds for the last few weeks. I just don't think it's the way to go. Wool has cuticles and it really should be dusted properly. I would think the compound would also get caught in the cuticles. The compound over time would also travel to the backing, later causing dry rot. This is where the customer needs to be educated into letting you take it offsite to clean it right. Dust it, clean the wool, us an upholstery tool on the linens and silks if super fragile. Low heat, low pressure. If something goes wrong, you have time to fix it if you are in a controlled environment.

We can get away with high heat, high suction, High pH, and high flow on carpets, but natural fibers on rugs are different. Anyway, just my thoughts.
The wool is not the issue. When i clean in plant i use tons of water and do many full submersion cleanings on a single rug. When i clean wool on location im not afraid to use a resonable water.

The issue is the linen and silk content.
I would perfer to not use dry compound-- but in this case and in God's rug example-- maybe compund is the best choice
 

Nomad74

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The wool is not the issue. When i clean in plant i use tons of water and do many full submersion cleanings on a single rug. When i clean wool on location im not afraid to use a resonable water.

The issue is the linen and silk content.
I would perfer to not use dry compound-- but in this case and in God's rug example-- maybe compund is the best choice
Do you have a pic of this rug? It sounds like a lot of fun.
 

Jim Pemberton

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O
I've been thinking about the cleaning of wool rugs with compounds for the last few weeks. I just don't think it's the way to go. Wool has cuticles and it really should be dusted properly. I would think the compound would also get caught in the cuticles. The compound over time would also travel to the backing, later causing dry rot.
There was a time that this was a potential issue with cellulose compounds. The size and structure of the materials used today are far less likely to do that now Damon.
 

Mikey P

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Rent or borrow a crb and use the extra soft brushes.

A shark isn't going to cut it, or extract the amount of compound you'll need.

Why would you get rid of your CRB?

use CCA compound, Excellent Supply and Interlinks sell it. It's the largest particle of the bunch, so it's the easiest to extract.
 

Jim Pemberton

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See what happens when I think.
Not at all Damon; we used Host Compound on rugs back in the early 80's and had trouble getting it out, and I had some commercial inspections I was involved with in the 90's that were so loaded with it that HWE was causing browning.

Its a legitimate concern.

As you also said dusting is also something that removes an incredible amout of dry soil that can't be duplicated on location.

I still feel a discussion of taking care of rugs in the home is worthwhile.

In reality, natural fiber upholstery is also best cleaned in plant. When you look at what it takes to deal with stains, texture issues, and just the time it takes to restore heavily soiled cotton, viscose, and rayon, cleaning it in plant when you can work on it in a controlled environment makes worlds of sense.

But its also not always practical.

The "instructor" in me "knows what's best" (or so I tell myself) . But what's best isn't always what can be done for everyone, or in every community.
 

Jimmy L

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What options are there in dry compound products?
Do they have any websites to order from?

Certified used to make a dry compound.

Something reasonable priced.
Buying from interlink is too pricey
 

Papa John

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Rent or borrow a crb and use the extra soft brushes.

A shark isn't going to cut it, or extract the amount of compound you'll need.

Why would you get rid of your CRB?

use CCA compound, Excellent Supply and Interlinks sell it. It's the largest particle of the bunch, so it's the easiest to extract.
I wish i didn't sell my CRB now. I sold it because I rarely used it, it was a 20 inch and i have a Cimex and 360i-bh. I might buy the 10 inch model because it would be nice to have for some stairs. I can rent a host machine for $35/day, which i might do while i decide if I want to add Dry compound to my arsenal.

Getting NatraDri seems easy but Nkapper wasn't available at interlink. should I substitute another chem?

Just say no.
Ill probably regret not following this advise. I have great respect for you and Brian H. however I have several high end clients with similar challenging rugs that are only lightly soiled, some from Stark and with viscose. I tried cleaning with HWE using an SS upholstery tool, and low moisture and wasn't totally happy.
The recent article in CleanFax claimed that Dry compound beat HWE in 2 competitions!? I doubt this is true buy I want to keep an open mind and my investment low while I decide.
 

Cleanworks

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The proper way to use host, is to prespray first, distribute the host product, scrub and remove. The host product absorbs the prespray and soil.
 
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Brian H

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Ill probably regret not following this advise. I have great respect for you and Brian H. however I have several ....
Uh uh... you are putting the pressure on me now!!!

In this situation, I like to have the customer sign off acknowledging that they know that the method they want us to clean is not recommended and that ANY damage associated with the cleaning is the responsibility of the homeowner and not us.
 

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