How do you politely tell people they bought a stupid fabric?

Mikey P

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this has been the toughest App segment to write...


Natural Fabric Issues
Natural fiber fabrics have long been valued for their feel and texture as well as their appearance. Many also appreciate natural fibers for their low impact on the environment. While most modern synthetic upholstery fabrics can handle the aggressive measures it takes to remove heavy soiling, most natural fiber fabrics require a lighter touch.

Cotton, Linen, Silk, Wool and Viscose fabrics are all susceptible to color loss, bleeding, texture change, shrinkage, yellowing or worse if not handled with care by an experienced IICRC certified textile specialist. Specialty water based cleaning agents and tools all must be carefully chosen and used with expertise to prevent damage to the fabric.

There are low moisture and dry cleaning methods available that are very safe but unfortunately are not very effective on heavy soiling. If your natural fiber upholstery piece has been neglected or abused, there can be no guarantee that the end result will meet your expectations

Using a pair of abused cotton blue jeans as an example, with every wash cycle some shrinkage, color loss, thinning of the material and some permanent staining occurs. For this reason we recommend that natural fiber upholstery only be used in low use areas of your home.

The IICRC highly recommends having all natural fabrics treated with a fabric protector. The protective barrier will help keep stains from setting, make vacuuming dry soils more effective and will allow for more aggressive measures to be used during spot or professional cleanings.




Obviously not Darcie'd yet...


I'm totally open to taking another approach....
 
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Desk Jockey

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Mrs. Reshbitch unfortunately some fabrics are chosen for their aesthetic value with little or no thought to maintenance. Not all fabrics clean equally, in fact the higher end materials tend to be the least unforgiving when it comes to wear and staining.

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ruff

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Well, you can ask sweetly:
"When choosing this fabric were you using a designer?"
If necessary expand: "Cause, ......you certainly acted like one."

If you prefer subtle: "Let your next fabric choice be made from peach blossoms, I heard good things about it."
 
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J Scott W

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Natural fibers have fabrics have long been valued for their feel and texture as well as their appearance. Many also appreciate natural fibers for their low impact on the environment.

Natural fibers, including cotton, linen, and flax are significantly more absorbent than synthetic fibers such as olefin, nylon and polyester which tend to resist liquids. This means natural fibers can easily absorb spills and other soils. Therefore it is important that they be protected against this threat and cleaned by properly by IICRC trained technicians who are specialists in caring for your valuable fabrics.
 
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this has been the toughest App segment to write...


Natural Fabric Issues
While most modern synthetic upholstery fabrics can handle the aggressive measures it takes to remove heavy soiling, there are still many fabrics that require a lighter touch.

Cotton, Linen, Silk, Wool and Viscose fabrics are all susceptible to color loss, bleeding, texture change, shrinkage, yellowing or worse if not handled with care by an experienced IICRC certified textile specialist. Specialty cleaning agents, scrubbing devices and extraction tools all must be chosen and used with a delicate touch to prevent distortion to the fabric.
There are low moisture and dry cleaning methods available that are very safe but unfortunately are not very effective on heavy soiling. If your natural fiber upholstery piece has been neglected or abused, keep your expectations low on the cleaning results.

Using a pair of cotton blue jeans as an example, with every wash cycle some initial shrinkage, color loss, thinning of the material and some permanent staining occurs. For this reason we recommend that natural fiber upholstery to only be used in low use areas of your home.

The IICRC highly recommends having all natural fabrics treated with a fabric protector. The protective barrier will help keep stains from setting, make vacuuming dry soils more effective and will allow for more aggressive measures to be used during spot or professional cleanings.




Obviously not Darcie'd yet...


I'm totally open to taking another approach....
I think the easiest way to explain how difficult it is to clean a particular fabric or if a fabric isn’t cleanable, is to compliment the client first to let them know you understand why the bought the fabric. Second explain why designers sell these products. Third explain that many fabrics that are sold today are designed to be used and disposed of(thrown away). They should be protected when new, cleaned on the maintenance level and corrections/restorative cleanings will yield minimal results.
 
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Makes sense, aside from the third point;
‘But the design house I bought it from said it would be easy maintenance’....
Anyone ever hear that?
I have... on almost every job that has a poor quality, high cost fabric involved...
Trying to explain to them that the sales associate doesn’t have a clue when it comes to cleaning/maintenance is the most difficult part...
They some how associate high cost, high society with quality ACROSS THE BOARD.....
They can’t seem to grasp the concept that that individual is PAID to sell, NOT TO CLEAN said fabric/upholstery/carpeting....
Then, they contact the store, they in turn contact the manufacturer, and THEY THEN LIE THROUGH THEIR TEETH, cause they are clueless aswell....
It’s a vicious circle....
In the end, (as the professional that’s contracted to clean said ‘designer piece of disposable shit’),
Lose out....
 

The Great Oz

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Doesn't help with Mikey's write-up, but I just tell them that our general rule of thumb is that the better a fabric looks or the more it costs, the more care it needs. A plaid recliner from Sears is easy to clean, but it will never look better than a plaid recliner.

To keep from dissing the person that likely referred us, I let them know it's important to tell a designer/salesperson if their furniture will get everyday use by kids/pets/guys so they can recommend the most appropriate fabrics.

(The designer should ask, but a lot of women buy to suit how they aspire to live rather than how they actually live.)

PS: What current store can I use that would generate the same mental picture as Sears?
 

Mikey P

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Natural Fabric Issues
Natural fiber fabrics have long been valued for their feel and texture as well as their appearance. Many also appreciate natural fibers for their low impact on the environment. While most modern synthetic upholstery fabrics can handle the aggressive measures it takes to remove heavy soiling, most natural fiber fabrics require a lighter touch.

Cotton, Linen, Silk, Wool and Viscose fabrics are all susceptible to color loss, bleeding, texture change, shrinkage, yellowing or worse if not handled with care by an experienced IICRC certified textile specialist. Specialty water based cleaning agents and tools all must be carefully chosen and used with expertise to prevent damage to the fabric.

There are low moisture and dry cleaning methods available that are very safe but unfortunately are not very effective on heavy soiling. If your natural fiber upholstery piece has been neglected or abused, there can be no guarantee that the end result will meet your expectations

Using a pair of abused cotton blue jeans as an example, with every wash cycle some shrinkage, color loss, thinning of the material and some permanent staining occurs. For this reason we recommend that natural fiber upholstery only be used in low use areas of your home.

The IICRC highly recommends having all natural fabrics treated with a fabric protector. The protective barrier will help keep stains from setting, make vacuuming dry soils more effective and will allow for more aggressive measures to be used during spot or professional cleanings.
 

bob vawter

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The problem IS...stupid people really
Don know they are stupid AND you'll
Never convince them they are!

You gotta come out wit KEY phrases
That helps them figure it out for themselves...
...i.e. Marty you sure are a dumb ass...
Keep it subtle!
 

Desk Jockey

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The problem IS...stupid people really
Don know they are stupid AND you'll
Never convince them they are!

You gotta come out wit KEY phrases
That helps them figure it out for themselves...
...i.e. Marty you sure are a dumb ass...
Keep it subtle!
Bawb...uhhh I don't know if you're capable of understanding this but...

😅
 
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roro

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Natural Fabric Issues

Cotton, Linen, Silk, Wool and Viscose fabrics are all ...

Using a pair of abused cotton blue jeans as an example, ...

The IICRC highly recommends having all natural fabrics treated with a fabric protector. The protective barrier will help keep stains from setting, make vacuuming dry soils more effective and will allow for more aggressive measures to be used during spot or professional cleanings.
Why confuse by using viscose which is just one form of rayon.
Why do the jeans have to be abused?
Suggested add on to final paragraph. "Application of a fabric protectant will also usually reveal any inherent vice in the crappy fabric you bought by revealing such things as poor dye fasteness. This allows you to pin the blame on the guy who made or sold you on it, rather than the poor impoverished cleaner who usually cops the blame":evil:
 
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Numero Uno

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Due to the complexities of the many fibers made.
Simply call me in future when you have made final selections.
I will suggest the best wearing version you selected.
Also remember why pay them alot of hard earned cash for protection with guarantee.
When I can do as well an ensure better protection application .
Shine ,make them realize your not just a average Joe
Get the protector money.
Whilst leaning to the fabric you want an prefer to clean.
An while at the home looking over fabrics fast.
Set up a cleaning for whatever else you see fit...
Maximize your time an your image ..
 

Mikey P

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Due to the complexities of the many fibers made.
Simply call me in future when you have made final selections.
I will suggest the best wearing version you selected.
Also remember why pay them alot of hard earned cash for protection with guarantee.
When I can do as well an ensure better protection application .
Shine ,make them realize your not just a average Joe
Get the protector money.
Whilst leaning to the fabric you want an prefer to clean.
An while at the home looking over fabrics fast.
Set up a cleaning for whatever else you see fit...
Maximize your time an your image ..


I do believe you've missed the ideal behind this project.

These are information "sheets" (pdfs) that new and or verbally challenged cleaners or office staff can share with customers.
 

Mikey P

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what do you think of this alternative?


Upholstery fabrics may be made from any number of fibers, both from man made or natural origins. Those fibers made from plant-based materials, whether directly (cotton and linen, as examples) or by a man made manufacturing process (rayon, viscose, Tencel), and in some cases from protein sources (wool and silk) are often less durable, and more likely to absorb soils and spills deeply within the fiber structure itself.

What does this mean to you?

If you have furnishings that have these “natural sources”, it may be impossible to completely remove all soils and stains without the risk of damage to the texture, appearance, or color of the fabric. Your IICRC cleaner is trained in the use of both the safest and most effective cleaning procedures, but cannot guarantee the final result will be satisfactory when they attempt to clean fabrics made from these types of fibers.

Having such fabrics cleaned before soiling becomes apparent, as well as the application of fabric protection treatments, will enable you to enjoy the beauty of your belongings longer.
 

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