How would you like these two IICRC standard subjects to read...?

Mikey P

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I was assigned these two sections to edit before next Wednesday. With my trip to San Diego starting tomorrow I wont be able to focus much on this so I would greatly appreciate some input from those you you who give a hoot.

Keeping in mind that the re-writing of the standards as a whole, is to make them easier to understand for the "average" cleaning technician, especially those that are ESL.

Cut and paste into a new post with any edits that you feel would add to their "readability", please make your changes in bold





2.6 Water Hardness

Minerals dissolved in water will affect how well various cleaning products work. Cleaners should appreciate the value of cleaning with soft water.

Water in most locales contains various minerals, dissolved in slightly acidic rainwater as it filters through the soil. Water that is rich in salts of calcium, magnesium, or iron is called hard water. Soft water, on the other hand, is virtually free of these minerals. These minerals in hard water can combine with cleaning agents, especially the anionic type, and adversely affect cleaning ability.

Well-built cleaning agents contain materials called sequestering agents that can soften water to counteract water hardness, but that at times may not be enough. There are surfactants that are not adversely affected in their cleaning efficacy by hardness in water.

In addition, calcium salts are usually present as calcium carbonate, especially when water is heated. This forms scale on heat transfer surfaces and reduces their efficiency. Unfortunately, some sequestering agents that soften the water for detergent hardness can enhance scale formation on cleaning equipment.

The use of naturally soft water or softened water is recommended to provide increased cleaning performance from the cleaning agents used and to reduce potential for scale and other forms of damage to the equipment.




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2.8 Odors


The presence of increased humidity resulting due to cleaning increase our perception of odors.Deodorants or odor counteractants are often employed to treat unpleasant odors. There are four deodorizing principles: remove the source (as practical); clean off significant residue, recreate the conditions of penetration using an appropriate odor counteractant, and seal as necessary. Deodorization specialists should be consulted if odors persist after normal cleaning.
 
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FredC

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Jul 13, 2011
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15,497
I was assigned these two sections to edit before next Wednesday. With my trip to San Diego starting tomorrow I won't be able to focus much on this so I would greatly appreciate some input from those of you you who give a hoot.

Keeping in mind that the purpose of re-writing of the standards as a whole, is to make them easier to understand for the "average" cleaning technician, especially those that are ESL.

Cut and paste this into a new post with any edits that you feel would add to their "readability", please make your changes in bold
 

Brian H

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Dec 14, 2006
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Detroit Michigan area
Name
Brian H
I was assigned these two sections to edit before next Wednesday. With my trip to San Diego starting tomorrow I won't be able to focus much on this so I would greatly appreciate some input from those of you you who give a hoot.

Keeping in mind that the purpose of re-writing of the standards as a whole, is to make them easier to understand for the "average" cleaning technician, especially those that are ESL.

Cut and paste this into a new post with any edits that you feel would add to their "readability", please make your changes in bold
 
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Brian H

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Brian H
The presence of increased humidity resulting due to cleaning increases our perception of odors.Deodorants or odor counteractants are often employed to treat unpleasant odors. There are four deodorizing principles:
  1. remove the source (as practical).
  2. clean off significant residue.
  3. recreate the conditions of penetration using an appropriate odor counteractant.
  4. seal as necessary.
Deodorization specialists should be consulted if odors persist after normal cleaning.
 

Brian H

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Joined
Dec 14, 2006
Messages
2,118
Location
Detroit Michigan area
Name
Brian H
Minerals dissolved in water will affect how well various cleaning products work. Water in most locales contains various minerals, dissolved in slightly acidic rainwater as it filters through the soil. Water that is rich in salts of calcium, magnesium, or iron is called hard water. Soft water, on the other hand, is virtually free of these minerals.
Cleaners should, where possible, use soft water as minerals in hard water can combine with cleaning agents, especially the anionic type, and adversely affect cleaning ability. Well-built cleaning agents contain materials called sequestering agents that can soften water to counteract water hardness, but that at times may not be enough. Also, there are surfactants (products added to the cleaning solution that allow in to penetrate better) that are not adversely affected in their cleaning effectiveness by hardness in water.
In addition, when calcium salts are present as calcium carbonate, they can form scale, especially when water is heated. This scale forms on heat transfer surfaces (such as in heat exchangers and heaters) and reduces their efficiency. Unfortunately, some sequestering agents that soften the water for detergent hardness can enhance scale formation on cleaning equipment.
The use of naturally soft water or softened water is recommended to provide increased cleaning performance from the cleaning agents used and to reduce potential for scale and other forms of damage to the equipment.



You're welcome.
 

The Great Oz

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Nov 25, 2006
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seattle
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bryan
Keeping in mind that the re-writing of the standards as a whole, is to make them easier to understand for the "average" cleaning technician, especially those that are ESL.
So... sixth grade reading level:

2.6 Water Hardness

Water is given a hardness rating by measuring the amount of minerals that are in a given amount of water. Minerals dissolved in water will affect how well various cleaning products work and higher mineral concentrations in "hard water" have a negative effect on cleaning ability.

If soft water is not available, use a cleaning solution made to compensate for hard water.

Calcium is one of the minerals found in hard water that can create a scale coating on the surfaces of heat exchangers, reducing their efficiency. Some cleaning products that are designed to improve cleaning efficiency when using hard water can create more scale and their use will require more frequent maintenance.
 

Mikey P

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Joined
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Messages
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Minerals dissolved in water will affect how well various cleaning products work. Water in most locales contains various minerals, dissolved in slightly acidic rainwater as it filters through the soil. Water that is rich in salts of calcium, magnesium, or iron is called hard water. Soft water, on the other hand, is virtually free of these minerals.
Cleaners should, where possible, use soft water as minerals in hard water can combine with cleaning agents, especially the anionic type, and adversely affect cleaning ability. Well-built cleaning agents contain materials called sequestering agents that can soften water to counteract water hardness, but that at times may not be enough. Also, there are surfactants (products added to the cleaning solution that allow in to penetrate better) that are not adversely affected in their cleaning effectiveness by hardness in water.
In addition, when calcium salts are present as calcium carbonate, they can form scale, especially when water is heated. This scale forms on heat transfer surfaces (such as in heat exchangers and heaters) and reduces their efficiency. Unfortunately, some sequestering agents that soften the water for detergent hardness can enhance scale formation on cleaning equipment.
The use of naturally soft water or softened water is recommended to provide increased cleaning performance from the cleaning agents used and to reduce potential for scale and other forms of damage to the equipment.



You're welcome.


The nerds and chemists loved this!
 

Mikey P

Administrator
Joined
Oct 6, 2006
Messages
83,746
Location
The High Chapperal
The presence of increased humidity resulting after wet cleaning increases our perception of odors.Deodorants or odor counteractants are often employed to treat unpleasant odors. There are four deodorizing principles:
  1. remove the source (as practical).
  2. clean off significant residue.
  3. recreate the conditions of penetration using an appropriate odor counteractant.
  4. seal as necessary.
Deodorization specialists should be consulted if odors persist after normal cleaning.
 

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