Liquid VS Powder

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When comparing the average size pale of LIQUID chemical VS same similar pale of POWDER chemical, what are the comparisons in usage rates? Looking for researched numbers, I realized powder will go further.
 
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In a prespray we would use ~4 oz. of Powder vs. ~8 oz. of Liquid/gallon

With a powder like our PowerMax ; you can have some advantages:

1. Surfactant Blend with more chelating builders
2. d-Limonene citrus solvent for grease cutting
3. Percarbonate for oxidizing stains (pH -10.5)
4. Oxygen-stable actual enzyme for stain removal.

With liquid presprays like our H.D. Preconditioner:

1. More solvents in the formulation
2. More surfactants in the formulation.
3. Oxygen components more difficult or not stable
4. Enzyme components more difficult or not stable

So for stains and urine, the powder would work better {oxy + enzyme}.

Liquid is easier to mix, and can be used in stronger dilutions when required.

http://www.cobbcarpet.com/zen/index...earch_in_description=1&keyword=DCPM7+or+DCHP1
 
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In a prespray we would use ~4 oz. of Powder vs. ~8 oz. of Liquid/gallon

With a powder like our PowerMax ; you can have some advantages:

1. Surfactant Blend with more chelating builders
2. d-Limonene citrus solvent for grease cutting
3. Percarbonate for oxidizing stains (pH -10.5)
4. Oxygen-stable actual enzyme for stain removal.

With liquid presprays like our H.D. Preconditioner:

1. More solvents in the formulation
2. More surfactants in the formulation.
3. Oxygen components more difficult or not stable
4. Enzyme components more difficult or not stable

So for stains and urine, the powder would work better {oxy + enzyme}.

Liquid is easier to mix, and can be used in stronger dilutions when required.

http://www.cobbcarpet.com/zen/index...earch_in_description=1&keyword=DCPM7+or+DCHP1
I see how powder is better for urine and stains, but would the liquid be better for ground in soil that’s left over from vacuuming like red clay due to having more surfactants?
 
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Powders for pre spray are more concentrated

Liquid rinses like liquid 90 mix easier really concentrated 16 oz in a 5 gal pre mix does a good job.

One gallon will get you 8 5 gal pre mixes
 
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Larry has a good summary. Based on a settling of powders and included scoops measure by volume, you need to think 100 volume ounces by jar instead of 128 volume aounce for a gallon. You can shake the powder to increase volume before measuring. Here is an article where I talk in more detail about powders and liquids. Alot of products used in this industry can not be made in powdered form. http://www.cleanfax.com/carpet-cleaning/liquids-versus-powders/
 
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I remember, as a former formulator, of writing a several page article on this subject for CleanFax about 5-6 years ago.

A very quick over-view: One can not evaluate "which formulation (Generally speaking, either a liquid or powder) unless you are comparing specific name brand products.

Liquids: (most commonly) have "water" mixed in with the "Liquid" concentrate.
Powders: (most commonly) have "fillers) mixed in with the "Powder" concentrate.

Either could be equal to each other, or more concentrated than the other. All depends on the Manufacturer.

The main advantage (other than the concentrate formulated into either product) is Storage and life of product. Powder having the advantage here.
 
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Matt;

Good question.

However, similar to what I stated above, many times there is no difference. All depends on the manufacturer, what they use, and the concentration of what they put in the container; either in a box, bag, or plastic jug.

Also remember that by adding water to a powder, makes it a liquid. Thus, what would the difference be between this particular Powder; or, the (same) particular Liquid? Nothing.

Hope this helps and doesn't confuse the original question.
 
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Some have a harder time using powers , seems like the guys running CC instead of GPH Meters.

Personally I like Powers except for my rinses..... its easier to dilute liquid in 5gal tanks than the powders.

Powders seem to hold a higher concentrate and I don't worry about them leaking as much ... bust a jug and you can recover quite a bit of power, liquid is gone
 
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The bulk of surfactants do not come in powdered form. I have a powdered surfactant in Oxy Buff Cotton Shampoo. I got a few samples of the powdered surfactants available to me and most were of a type that I would not use in cleaning formulas.

If you use soft water then there is nothing better than a powdered rinse. Phosphates are great at aiding the rinsing process by carrying away globs of soil and oil much better than water alone. Surfactants in the rinse allow for deeper rinsing. Both surfactants and phosphates work great at high dilutions. Hard water uses phosphates for softening making them not available for rinsing.
 

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