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Mikey P

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IICRC Consumer Floor and Furnishings Care Information

1. Wine
2. Coffee/Tea

3. Kool Aid

4. Blood

5. Vomit

6. DIY Oxy Stains

7. Non-Professional carpet and fabric spotter residue

8. Bleach

9. Medicine and Acne Medications

10. Smoke Related Odors

11. Curry and other food odors

12. Skunk

13. Mold and Musty Odors

14. Animal Stains/Urine & feces

15. Dander and Allergens

16. Fume Fading/Discoloration Under Rugs

17. Pile Distortion Issues- Shading, Pooling, Fading, Shedding

18. Carpet Rippling

19. Delamination

20. Wear

21. Corn Rowing

22. Wicking (or reappearing spots or soil)

23. Rapid Re-soiling

24. Browning

25. Soil Filtration Lines







1.Wine
Most wine spills are easy to remove if dealt with immediately. While the internet offers many DIY suggestions, it’s strongly recommended that you follow the spot cleaning procedure below.
For larger (whole bottle) spills, extract as much of the wine as possible with a wet/dry vacuum or a carpet extractor prior to following the recommendations in the spotting guide. If the wine reached the carpet backing or pad, you may see some of the spot reappear within a few days, this is called wicking. Mist fresh 3% hydrogen peroxide on the area and gently blot with a microfiber towel to eliminate the spot.

1. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

2. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

3. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot.

4. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application.

5. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide*, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved.This may take several hours or a few attempts. *bleaching around the wine spot may occur with natural fibers

6. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water after no evidence of the spot remains.


7. In some situations, red wine can leave a stubborn lingering red or pink stain behind that will need special attention from an IICRC Certified Cleaning Professional. This is seen most often with natural fibers or older synthetic carpet or textiles.

Care Tips:
Keep a one or two gallon wet/dry vacuum nearby that can be easily accessed and used to extract wine, coffee, soda, pet messes, and other liquid spills.













2.Coffee/Tea
Removing coffee and tea spills from carpet and textiles can vary in success based on a number of factors. When you consider that both coffee and tea are used in the Middle East to dye wool rugs, it’s understandable that complete removal from natural fibers can take considerable efforts. Depending on the individual fiber types and if any sort of stain protection was applied,100% removal may not be possible.

Additives such as milk, sugar, coloring agents used in manufacturing, etc, can complicate the removal process. The size and penetration of the spill will also influence the amount of effort and number of attempts needed for complete removal. If the liquid penetrated through the backing or padding, the spot may return after the carpet dries, this is called wicking. Mist fresh 3% hydrogen peroxide on the area and gently blot with a microfiber towel to eliminate the spot.


Please follow the guidelines below. If you are not satisfied with your results, please consult with your IICRC Certified Cleaner for more advanced techniques.

1. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

2. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

3. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot

4. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

5. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved.This may take several hours or a few attempts

6. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.







3.Kool-Aid

Success in removing stains from Kool-Aid and or other liquids containing food coloring, can be very difficult to remove. Fresh spills on new stain-resistant synthetic carpet and textiles may come clean with basic carpet cleaning methods. Older spills on natural fibers or older, worn carpet are more difficult to remove.
Red food dyes are nearly identical to the dye used to color the carpet, so removing them requires techniques, products, and equipment that homeowners do not have access to. Consult with your IICRC Certified Cleaner about risks involved with stain removal. Patching is another option in severe cases.

Fresh spills can be dealt with as follows:

1. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

2. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

3.If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot

4. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

5. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved. This may take several hours or a few attempts.

6. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

7. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.














4.Blood
According to OSHA and the CDC, blood (and any bodily fluid) should be considered pathogenic, and may require special cleaning procedures and disposal processes not included with normal carpet cleaning. Small droplets of blood will often come out of most textiles with ease, while larger spills will require an IICRC Technician certified in Hazard Waste Removal. Medications in the bloodstream of the human or pet may prevent 100% removal of the spots due to synthetic dyes used in the manufacture of the medications.

Care Tips:
For small droplets of blood on synthetic textiles you can try the following:

1. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

2. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

3. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area, and blot.

4. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

5. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved.This may take several hours or a few attempts

6. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.

Be sure to wear proper Personal Protective Equipment (eye protection, gloves and long sleeves) and avoid coming into contact with blood in any situation.










5.Vomit
According to OSHA and CDC, vomit is considered pathogenic. For this reason, your IICRC Certified Carpet Cleaner needs to take safety precautions which are not part of regular cleaning. Vomit will contain stomach acids and possibly food or medicine dyes which could permanently alter carpet and textile fibers. The longer vomit stays in contact with your carpet or upholstery, the more likely you are to have staining and lingering odor issues. Due to vomit’s liquidity, your carpet pad or upholstery cushions may need subsurface treatments and possible disposal.

Care Tips: Use a wet/dry vacuum to extract as much vomit as possible prior to any spot cleaning attempts.

To attempt to clean up the vomit yourself, try the following:

1. Remove as much solid matter as possible.

2. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

3. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

4.If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot

5. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

6. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved. This may take several hours or a few attempts

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.












6. Do It Yourself “Oxy” spotter stains
There are many consumer-grade carpet and fabric spotter products on the market today that contain “Oxy”, otherwise known as oxygen bleach. While these solutions can be effective at removing organic soil and spots, if the solution is not thoroughly rinsed from the textile immediately after use, permanent bleaching can occur over time. Most synthetic carpets will turn a light yellowish-brown color, but pink and orange are possible, too.
Many of these products contain surfactants or detergents that will attract soil to the area if not thoroughly rinsed. Over time, new soil will “stick” to the residue creating a dark area.


During a professional cleaning, it’s common for the soil to be removed and a yellow discoloration or other form of color change to reveal itself during the cleaning. . Unfortunately, this can only be corrected by dyeing or patching. Ask your IICRC Certified Technician if they provide these services or for a referral.


Most spots in your home come from food and beverage spills or accidental discharges of urine, vomit, or feces. In most of these cases, spots can be removed using the following steps:

1. Remove as much solid matter as possible.

2. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

3. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

4. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot.

5. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

6. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved. This may take several hours or a few attempts

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.









7. Non-Professional carpet and fabric spot remover residue
There are endless carpet and fabric spotting solutions available in stores and online. Unfortunately, many of these products cause more problems than they solve, such as leaving sticky/dirt-attracting residues, color loss, yellowing, texture change, and other unwanted results, even when the directions are followed.
Stay away from any product that says that rinsing or neutralizing is not needed.
A good test to check for any residue issues is to place a half ounce of the product at its recommended dilution in a small glass and let it evaporate. If there is any detectable sticky residue in the glass you can assume the same residue will be left on your carpet or fabric and will attract soil or worse.
Advancements in fiber and stain protection technology make spot cleaning synthetic carpet and upholstery fairly easy. We recommend you try the following procedure before using over the counter spot removal products:

1. Remove as much solid matter as possible.

2. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

3. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

4. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot

5. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

6. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved. This may take several hours or a few attempts

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.












8. Bleach Stains

Complete or moderate color loss to most textiles will occur if exposed to chlorine bleach (Clorox). Equal or greater damage can occur from oxygen (Oxy) bleach spotters or boosters if they are not fully rinsed and neutralized. Most commonly, light yellow to pure white discoloration is the end result of exposure to chlorine bleach. Unfortunately, only dyeing or patching can correct bleach damage.

Ask your IICRC Certified Technician if they provide these services or for a referral.

The one exception to this is olefin fibers, which are bleach-proof and should be considered for carpeted laundry rooms or areas near swimming pools.








































9. Medicine and Acne medications
Many household and prescription medicines contain dyes that are nearly identical to fabric and carpet dyes. When these dyes come into contact with textiles, they can be difficult to remove without causing further damage.
Benzoyl peroxide (common acne medication) can cause bleaching when exposed to hot water used in a professional cleaning which activates the peroxide in the medication. Unfortunately, the medication-stained area can only be corrected by spot dyeing or patching.
Ask your IICRC Certified Technician if they offer these services or have someone to refer.







































10.Smoke Related Odors
Tobacco, cannabis, soot from fireplaces and wildfire, and other fire-related odors in the carpet can also be present in other absorbent items in the home. Smoke odor molecules from any source will attach to upholstery, baseboards, drywall, window coverings, bedding, and/or the HVAC system. While a thorough cleaning and deodorizing of the carpet will help, be prepared to have all absorbent surfaces in the affected area cleaned and deodorized in order to fully remove any residual smoke odor. . In extreme cases your hard surfaces such as walls, ceilings, tile, wood, or vinyl flooring may need mitigation as well.
If your regular carpet cleaning company does not provide these extensive services, use this link to find an IICRC Certified Odor Control Specialist https://www.iicrc.org/page/IICRCGlobalLocator























11.Curry and other food related odors
Curry is especially complex and difficult to remove as it consists of tamarind, onion, coriander, chili pepper, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek, pepper, and mustard all combined. Cooking odors in the carpet can also be present in other absorbent items in the home. Cooking odor molecules will attach to furniture, baseboards, drywall, window coverings, bedding, and/or the HVAC system. While a thorough cleaning and deodorizing of the carpet will help, be prepared to have all absorbent surfaces in the affected area cleaned and deodorized. In extreme cases your hard surfaces such as walls, ceilings, tile, wood, or vinyl flooring may need mitigation as well.
If your regular carpet cleaning company does not provide these extensive services, use this link to find an IICRC Certified Odor Control Specialist https://www.iicrc.org/page/IICRCGlobalLocator







































12.Skunk odors
Skunk odors in the carpet can also be present in other absorbent items in the home. Odor molecules will attach to furniture, baseboards, drywall, window coverings, bedding, and/or the HVAC system. While a thorough cleaning and deodorizing of the carpet will help, be prepared to have all absorbent surfaces in the affected area cleaned and deodorized. In extreme cases your hard surfaces such as walls, ceilings, tile, wood, or vinyl flooring may need mitigation as well.
If your regular carpet cleaning company does not provide these extensive services, use this link to find an IICRC Certified Odor Control Specialist https://www.iicrc.org/page/IICRCGlobalLocator
If your pet is the source of the skunk odor, be sure to bathe him or her before proceeding to your floors and furnishings. Click here for tried and true instructions




























13. Mold and Musty odors in carpet and upholstery
The musty smell associated with mold or mildew is much like any other persistent odor and it’s best to eliminate it at the source. While there are many consumer-grade products available that will cover up or mask the smell of either problem, your health could be at risk by not eliminating the source. In many cases the source comes from the backing of the carpet or other sub floor surfaces which cannot be removed by professionally cleaning the surface fibers of the carpet. Often times with small water damage, homeowners don’t realize that the absorbent carpet padding can stay wet for an extended amount of time even if the surface carpet fibers are dry to the touch. This wet dark environment is perfect for mold and mildew to grow without being detected to the naked eye. If the area becomes damp again, or there is high humidity in the air, you may notice the odor returns. This can also occur when an affected area has been professionally cleaned and moisture/steam reactivates the odor.


The S100 Carpet Cleaning Standards reads as follows:
“Odors can occur from sources other than bodily discharges (e.g., hair, dander, and body oils from dogs and cats). Elevated heat and humidity created from the cleaning process can amplify odors, so they are more evident during and after cleaning and during warm, humid conditions. Mold and mildew odors perceived to be coming from the carpet can actually also be present in other absorbent items in the home such as furniture, baseboards, dry wall, window coverings, bedding as well as the HVAC system.”
Due to the dangers associated with breathing/ingesting mold, it is highly recommended that you consult with an IICRC Certified Mold Remediation Specialist.








14. Animal Stains and Odors

Dogs and cats may be our best friends, but they contribute to many issues when it comes to carpeting, draperies, and upholstery.

Urine: There are two types of reactions that can take place between the chemicals in an animal's urine and those in the dyes and fibers of textile furnishings. The first type of reaction is immediately noticeable. Some textile dyes change color as soon as urine comes into contact with them.
The other type of reaction develops slowly over several days or months and can result in permanent changes to the dyes and fiber. In many cases, this type of damage can only be seen with the aid of a Black/UV light. Not only can the dye/color change, but some fibers may become weakened or destroyed as the urine ages and decomposes. The decomposing urine can also produce an objectionable odor. After cleaning, these areas are more obvious because the soils which hid the changed color and damaged fibers have been removed. Also, dyes weakened by urine can be removed or bleed during professional cleaning.

Cleaning professionals use a black light to identify all areas that have urine that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Not all urine spots show, so this is the proper way to identify affected areas. It's important to understand that after cleaning, the area may still glow when observed under UV light. (Actually, the correct term is “fluoresce”—the treated area is reflecting the UV light back to your eyes as visible light.) This fluorescing is not due to the presence of urine in that spot, but from phosphorous left over from the breakdown of phosphocreatine. During that process the phosphorous becomes chemically bonded to the fibers as a dye would. Just like a dye, the phosphorous is now part of the surface of the fibers, and it is quite difficult to remove without damaging the existing dyes on those fibers. If the area still fluoresces after professional cleaning, it does not mean the service provider did an incomplete job removing the urine.


Feces: Solid pet feces is easier to remove than urine. Compact deposits can be quickly removed with a plastic scraper or spatula. The surface should then be cleaned with the standard spotting solution and blotted dry. Refer to the spotting steps below for further information and techniques. Follow this treatment with a sanitizer recommended by your IICRC Certified Cleaner or veterinarian.
Loose/runny feces require the same clean-up procedure as described for fresh urine removal. This should also be followed with an application of disinfectant.
If your pets' food or treats contain coloring or dyes, discoloration may remain at the site of the accident. Your IICRC Certified Cleaner may be able to remove this, but with caution as many food dyes are nearly identical to fabric dyes and some color loss or change may be unavoidable.

An IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner will have methods available to minimize the discoloration, disinfect the area, and reduce the smell. It is often impossible to completely restore the original appearance of a textile furnishing that has been damaged with aged pet urine, especially if homeowners attempt to remove the urine using the wrong products or methods. .


Care Tips: Use a wet/dry vacuum for the initial pick up of urine and loose feces and to extract spotting and rinsing agents.
Place a damp white cotton towel over affected areas to keep the affected area from drying if the spot cannot be cleaned right away Be aware that some disinfectants and oxy products may cause discoloration of textile furnishings and carpet if not fully rinsed and neutralized.






1. Remove as much solid matter as possible.

2. Blot the area (if still moist from the spill) with a dry absorbent cloth.

3. Blot with a cloth dampened with clear water. Microfiber cloths are ideal for this purpose.

4. If the spot remains, mix a few drops of liquid dish soap with a cup of water in a spray bottle and mist onto the area and blot.

5. Repeat until the spot disappears, making sure to blot between each application

6. Residual discoloration may be removed by applying 3% hydrogen peroxide, and leaving it on the spot until the desired result is achieved. This may take several hours or a few attempts

7. If you own a home spotting or carpet cleaning machine, rinse the area with clear water only after no evidence of the spot remains.

8. If these procedures do not work, call your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner.
















15. Dander and Allergens

Dander or “doggy odor” can intensify or be more noticeable after cleaning or in humid conditions. Removing dander odor from your home will require many steps including cleaning virtually all absorbent items and surfaces. Success may require more than one carpet cleaning attempt to remove the odor, and in extreme cases where the dander has penetrated to the backing pad or sub surfaces, replacement may be the only answer.
Pet hair and dander left in a vacuum cleaner will begin to decompose and lead to strong odors emitting from the vacuum’s exhaust. To reduce the likelihood of this happening, we suggest emptying the vacuum cleaner after every use. Damp dusting and vacuum cleaners with sealed bodies and fitted with HEPA filters reduce re-distribution of the dander dust into the air.
Dander is material shed from the body of dogs (and humans too) and other animals that have fur, hair, or feathers, similar to dandruff. Associated odors are more common with older pets and those with long hair.

To deodorize other textiles and hard surfaces in your home, we recommend consulting with an IICRC Certified Odor Specialist. We also highly recommend using a NADCA Certified HVAC Specialist to clean and deodorize your HVAC system (https://nadca.com/find-a-professional)

Care Tips:
Change your HVAC air filter on a regular basis
Brush your pets at least once a week
Empty your vacuum cleaner after every use
Wash pet beds and accessories often























16.Fume fading /discoloration under rugs
Yellowish discoloration typically found under area rugs laid over carpet is known as “BHT yellowing” or “Phenolic yellowing” .
Carpets that contain BHT(butylated hydroxytoluene) in the latex glue require breathing space. When objects like flat, legless furniture or area rugs are placed on top of carpet, the covered area does not receive enough air. The BHT reacts and causes yellowing.
Reversing the effects of phenolic yellowing on your carpet can be challenging. Removing the furniture or rug and exposing the carpet to air can lead to a gradual restoration of its color. Your IICRC Certified Technician can also apply citric acid to treat phenolic yellowing, but there’s no guarantee that either of these methods will correct the issue.












17.Four Examples of Pile Distortion Issues

Carpet and rug textures can appear to be inconsistent. It may look like the carpet is one color in an area and different in another and "change" when you look at it from a different angle. There are several reasons this could occur, some of which are natural characteristics and some develop from age or wear. For example:


1.Shading
Carpet shading is a normal characteristic of cut pile carpets, especially those with a smooth pile such as velvets and saxony plush. Carpet shading is considered an aesthetic quality of fine carpet and is not considered a defect. Shading is caused by light reflecting off of tufts that bend differently due to footprints, vacuuming, etc.

2.Pooling
Carpet/Rug pooling, also referred to as watermarking, occurs when an area of carpet fibers lay in a different direction than the rest of the fibers. Carpet pooling will often occur adjacent to trafficked areas, but occasionally pooling will occur in nearly new carpet where little foot traffic has taken place.
To better understand the effect of pooling, study the pooled area(‘s) from two opposing sides of the room, paying attention to how the darker and lighter areas reverse themselves as you move back and forth.


Pooling example of the same area from different angles



Click here for more information on shading and pooling https://www.scrt.org/scrt-free-repo...lated-pile-reversal-watermarking-shading/file







3. Fading
According to the IICRC S100 Cleaning Standards, your carpet‘s fading issues can result from several conditions:
a. Light, whether incandescent, fluorescent, or indirect and especially direct sunlight, all sources can have an effect on dyes after a period of prolonged exposure;
b. Soil, especially oily soil compositions, tends to affect dyes
c. Vapor (i.e., fume) or ozone, atmospheric gases passing over or through fibers, for prolonged periods, can have an effect on dyes. Some subfloor types and carpet underlayments can contain damaging fumes as well

4. Shedding

Are you noticing loose carpet fibers on your floor or in your vacuum? This is normal and does not mean that you have a defective carpet. Cut pile carpet is typically made from fibers 2-4 inches in length, which are spun together to create a soft, luxurious look and feel. In the manufacturing process these yarns are secured to the carpet within the latex backing. The short end pieces of these fibers that do not always get anchored into the latex and will become detached during vacuuming . Depending on the density of the carpet, this “shedding” can last up to 2 years (or more with wool carpet) and is not a cause for concern.


Care Tips:
-Consider having UV resistant film applied to windows that experience prolonged sunlight exposure.
-Close drapes or curtains to reduce sun exposure.
-Regular scheduled professional cleaning of fading-prone areas
-If your vacuum cleaner regularly pulls out fibers from your carpet you may be running the brush roll too low or the roll’s brushes may be too stiff for your carpet type.













18. Carpet Rippling

Wall-to-wall carpeting can experience rippling or become wavy for a few reasons:
1. Improper Installation

Carpeting can ripple if not stretched properly during installation. IICRC Installation Standards call for the installer to use a pole or power stretcher whenever possible to stretch your carpet from wall to wall. If your installer used a knee kicker to install your carpet, and not a power stretcher, it is not going to be stretched enough to meet manufacturers’ specifications.

2. Low Quality or Improper Padding

Low quality carpet padding may save you some money up front, but in the long run it can cost you. Always check the carpet manufacturer's specifications/recommendation for padding weight and density. before purchasing padding. Consult with your carpet retailer to ensure the padding you chose is the correct one to pair with your carpet. The incorrect padding can actually void the manu. warr. and lead to unwanted wrinkles and ripples.

3. Over-wetting

This can be the result of improper cleaning, flooding, or moisture in the subfloor. Over-wetting from cleaning processes can be avoided by utilizing a properly trained and IICRC certified technician. Ongoing moisture issues should be examined by an IICRC Certified Flooring Inspector

4. Delamination - (see the IICRC Delamination Information Sheet for further information)



If your carpet has experienced rippling after it’s been cleaned, do not take any measures to correct the issue for 48 hours. Improperly installed (loose) carpet will lay flat again 99% of the time.The moisture and humidity created during the cleaning process will often cause the backing material to swell, causing some rippling every time you have your carpet cleaned. We highly recommend having your carpet re-stretched by an IICRC Certified Carpet Repairman; correctly installed carpet wears better and lasts longer.


































19.Delamination
Most wall-to-wall carpet is constructed in layers with a primary and secondary backing. Latex glue is used between the two backings to secure the carpet yarns (see diagram below).
Delamination, or separation of the two backings, can occur when insufficient latex adhesive has been applied during manufacturing or when the latex is damaged by excessive pet urine, prolonged or repeated exposure to water, improper use of solvent spotting agents, excessive foot traffic, or the use of heavy rolling carts or wheelchairs. Delamination is rarely caused by proper cleaning procedures. Underneath office chairs or entry doorways that often get wet in the winter are common areas that delaminate over time. Lack of proper tension during the carpet’s install is another cause for delamination.
While repair by an IICRC Certified Repair Technician is sometimes possible, it’s not always cost effective when considering the carpet’s age, overall condition, and replacement costs.



Care Tips:
-Use a plastic mat under your office chairs to prevent carpet damage from the wheels.
-Use only water-based spotting agents.
-Consider having a 3’ by 3’ section of tile, wood, or vinyl installed in doorways rather than having carpet next to the door.
-When buying new carpet, make sure that the installers use a power stretcher to achieve proper tension of the carpet throughout your home.























20. Wear
Wear is the reduction in pile face weight as a result of traffic, abrasive soil build-up, improper maintenance and use. Distorted, flattened, frazzled, or tangled fibers or yarns do not constitute actual wear according to carpet manufacturer guidelines and warranties. .

Premature wear of your carpet’s fibers experienced after cleaning during the warranty period should be discussed with your flooring retailer and the manufacturer. To determine if the issue is under warranty, the carpet manufacturer may send out an independent inspector to determine if the carpet has been maintained to specifications and if the issue qualifies as wear or something not covered, like distortion. Most warranties suggest the use of an IICRC certified provider. In order to keep your carpet warranty in place, read it carefully and consult with your flooring retailer about what you are required to do to maintain the warranty.

Care tips:
-Frequent thorough vacuuming with a brushroll/beater bar-equipped vacuum cleaner
-Regularly scheduled professional cleanings by an IICRC Certified Technician
-Frequent furniture rotation will all help reduce wear in your carpet.






























21. Corn Rowing
Corn rowing appears most commonly on carpets made from fine, soft yarns, with a fairly high cut pile. In most cases the overall density is not adequate to support the yarns and keep them upright. If there is too much space between the rows, the tufts may be bent over when they are walked on. Soft, fine yarns do not spring back as readily as other carpet yarns made from heavier and denser fibers.

Corn rowing may appear on carpet before or after cleaning. It usually forms in a regular pattern with every fourth or fifth row of yarns bending over, as might happen in a row of corn. The condition may develop in traffic lanes and under doors that scrape the carpet as they are opened and closed. It generally occurs perpendicular to the traffic direction.

Although cleaning the carpet may make corn rowing apparent, , it is not the cause of the distorted pile surface. Corn rowing is simply an inherent characteristic of certain carpet constructions. Vacuuming and raking the carpet perpendicular to the traffic patterns may help in some cases. In extreme situations, we suggest you contact the manufacturer.










22.Wicking (or reappearing spots or soil)

Wicking, a common cause of recurring spots and stains, is a term used to describe the upward migration of water-soluble materials on carpet fiber surfaces during drying.
Regardless of the method used, carpet cleaning cannot always remove 100% of the soil deeply embedded in the carpet fibers. A certain amount of soil can be left behind at the base of yarns and on the carpet backing. This soil can move from the base of yarns and backing materials to the yarn tips, where it becomes a visible spot again after the carpet dries.

Care tips:
If your carpet is experiencing wicking after cleaning you can try these easy steps to fix the unsightly areas
-Let the carpet dry thoroughly for at least 48 hours
-Vacuum the area with a brush roll-equipped upright vacuum, slowly and from three or more directions
-Lightly mist distilled water on the affected area and gently blot with a microfiber (preferred) or white cotton towel. Look for soil transferring onto the towel.
-If effective, continue to lightly mist and blot until the carpet’s appearance returns to normal. 3% Hydrogen Peroxide works well too and will not cause a bleaching effect. Make sure it's a fresh, unopened bottle.
-Cover with 6-10 layers of white paper towel or a folded white terry cloth towel. Weigh down with a few books (separate book from paper towels with a plastic bag, to avoid water damage to books). Remove after 6-8 hours. You may have to change out the paper towels or towels several times until there is no visible transfer.

-Let the area dry and inspect
-If the carpet still does not look normal (keeping in mind that wicking usually occurs in high traffic areas and wear may still be obvious), consult with your IICRC Certified Technician to set up a return visit or for suggestions on what cleaning solutions would be best for your carpet type.
















23. Rapid Re-soiling
Resoiling occurs when the carpet becomes visibly soiled more quickly than it should after being cleaned. There are many potential causes for resoiling:
  • Detergent or soap residues not effectively rinsed during the cleaning process
  • Contaminants tracked in from the outside such as black top slurry, road salt or ice melt
  • Excessive soap residue left behind from untrained cleaners or DIY homeowner attempts at cleaning or spotting
  • Foot lotion or body oils from people or pets

It can take a bit of detective work with some analytical observations along with input from your IICRC Certified Professional Cleaner to come up with the reason or reasons behind your resoiling problem.


Care tips:
-Use absorbent walk off mats in entry and kitchen areas. Choose a mat or rug that can be easily laundered at home on a regular basis.
-Let your IICRC Certified Cleaning Technician know what spotting chemicals you may have used since the last cleaning; special rinsing methods may be needed.
-Be mindful of oily residues from feet or pets and take precautions to prevent their transfer to your carpet or rugs
































24.Brown out or Browning
Cellulosic browning occurs when plant-based carpet fibers such as jute or cotton dry slowly. Sugars or lignin in the plant fiber cells rise to the surface and leave a yellow to brown discoloration. The process is similar to an apple slice or wilted salad greens turning brown, and is easily corrected with the proper cleaning methods. Browning is sometimes confused with soil wicking.

If your carpet experienced browning after it dried, contact your IICRC Technician or Firm to set up a return visit to have the issue corrected. DO NOT attempt to fix browning yourself.

Care Tips:
-Dry vacuum natural fiber carpet frequently to prevent heavy soil load
-Have a fabric protection product applied when new and reapplied after a professional cleaning.
-Use fans and increase ventilation after cleaning to speed up the drying process.





















































25. Soil Filtration Lines
Soil filtration lines are dark, soiled areas that develop gradually on carpet. This staining is most commonly found around the edges of a room where the baseboard meets the carpet, under floor-length draperies, and under closed doors. They can also develop anywhere there is an air space, such as between floorboards or spaces in the sub-flooring. Also known as soil lines, smog lines, and perimeter soiling (when they occur around walls), the problem is usually more obvious close to forced hot air heating ducts, electric floor outlets, and gas valves. Bedroom doors that are closed at night, especially where windows are left open, are likely to develop the lines.

As air passes over the carpet, microscopic particles of dirt, dust, and soot are filtered from the air by the carpet fibers and become embedded in the carpet pile yarns. In areas where the air flows over the carpet more rapidly than normal, the carpet acts as a filter, catching the soil particles from the air. Filtration soil is exceptionally fine and can penetrate deeply and embed into the fibers.
Special techniques by a professional carpet cleaner are required to improve the appearance of soil filtration lines, but may not remove them completely. The degree of removal depends on the amount and type of soil, length of time the soil has accumulated, amount of airflow, color of carpet, and type of fiber. The lines can be removed from most synthetic fibers. However, in severe cases, especially on light colored carpets, traces may remain after cleaning. It is exceedingly difficult to remove filtration soiling completely from wool or olefin carpets.


Care Tips:
-Have your HVAC system periodically inspected and cleaned.
-Change your HVAC filters regularly.
-Use the edging tool on your upright or canister vacuum cleaner once a month or as needed to help remove dust and lint along baseboards.
-A damp microfiber towel can be gently blotted along the baseboard and stairwell edges to help remove some soiling. Wear thick leather gloves to protect your skin from the tack strip nails.
-Take the opportunity during re-flooring projects to have gaps between floors walls sealed.
-Limit burning candles, another known source of soil lines















Credit should be given to Darcie Smith, Meg Burdick, Scott Warrington, Craig Jasper, Matt Cole and Jim Pemberton for assisting in creating this content.
 

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