New Rug Rinse Wringer - MOR Time Saving Equipment

#3
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A wringer/rinser is possibly one of the most versatile and useful machines a medium size plant can have after a centrifuge. I bought one of the last ones the Mor company built nearly 20 years ago and we still use it every day, all day long.
 
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#4
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We are starting to plan our next building move, wanting to encompass all of our businesses under one roof (gallery/decor/furniture and cleaning) on a highly traveled road nearby.

I am beginning to plan how I'd like the rug plant to be laid out and I'm definitely allowing space for a rinser/wringer. Once our volume grows a bit more it will become necessity.

Some days I see how it could easily double or triple a small-mid size plant productivity.
 
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Tom why doesn't a wringer cause moisture related damage to "glue back" (tufted) rugs?

Wet is wet, right?
The compression wringer owners are the best ones to direct this question for the clear observation you seek.

Please note: Not all older compression wringers out there have rubber rollers that are in adequate condition. Some durometer readings on these older ones show the greater hardness affects adversely its efficiency to wring or squeeze out the water.

Tufted, a.k.a. glue backs, have inherent issues when wetted out. Glue degradation and backing separation are real issues due to construction. When speed of production is an issue: Some in-plant operations top clean these types and only wet the back minimally without a complete immersion saturation. Even so, these rugs become frustrating to deal with and heavy to handle. The compression wringer can lessen the drying time and minimize distortion of a rug that may happen through handling it a different way. The objective is to minimize the water entering and staying in the glue for long periods of time.

Like in any business decision, the volume of rugs, your price points to service them, weigh in on justifying the expense for such a tool. Large projection in-plant operation can process more rugs through a device such as this. The centrifuge is a drying method that is more effective. There are tradeoffs with each method. That is why some bigger plants have both.
 
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#9
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Mike, a medium size plant might do 6-10,000 square feet a week. It's all pretty relative of course, but there are lots of 'bigger' plants doing that much every day.

We put nearly all the tufted rugs we wash through a wringer. It speeds the process and as long as you are careful works just fine.

The problem with lower quality tufted rugs is that they are junk and not made to be durable or easy to clean. It's a market problem really. If the large import concerns demanded a better adhesive and less filler, paying just a bit more and refusing to buy the lower grade stuff, the whole situation would improved overnight. Changes like that might add less than a dollar per square foot to the landed cost of these goods in the US market, which could easily be passed along to the end buyers.
 
#12
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Except for Navajo rugs/blankets our regular retail cleaning charge is $4.00 per square foot for just about everything. Knotted/tufted/machine made, in wool, silk, all cellulose - pick up and delivery included.
 
#13
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We have 5 different price categories.

Class A
  • Mats
  • Rug padding

Class B

  • Machine made
  • unseamed carpet
Class C
  • Hand tufted
  • Karastan/karastan like
  • Synthetic custom rugs
Class D
  • Handmade and oriental rugs
  • Antiques
  • Wool custom rugs
Class E
  • Silks
  • Tapestries
  • Navajos
  • Furs

Of course there are always exceptions to every rule..
 
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I like the looks of the machine. It's close to the design of the Mor wringer we have, one of the last built by the Mor company under original ownership. The front end on the one exhibited in Detroit had a slightly different feed with the rug going under a roller bar that puts about a 20 degree 'bend' in the rug, allowing water to build up at the bend. I suppose it's a rinsing function (the pile of the rug being flexed under water) but I prefer a direct feed to the main wringer rollers. The machines are built to order so you can specify whatever small details you like. I'd add a variable control pressure pump to the front jets and a reverse switch. Reverse allows you to put 'mud rugs' on the wringer and run them backwards and forwards multiple times till most of the mud is squeezed out; kind of like a super squeegee, but infinitely less work. Cost is a major inhibitor, but as it stands now I could sell the machine I bought years ago for at least twice what I paid for it and I can't begin to calculate how much labor cost and sweat it has saved us. Money is cheaper today than it ever will be. If you bought a tool that cost less than an one employee for five years, and could sell at the ten year point for exactly what you paid for it, it makes sense even if you are only washing 500 square feet a day. And no, Tom and Greg don't pay me to say this stuff. I am a true believer. Anyone who cares to visit is welcome to see the tools in use.
 
#18
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So what is the foot print and cost of this machine? I interested in one that could handle an 8x10 without being too much longer then 9 or 10 ft.
Space is very limited for us and machinery that can't handle an 8x10 doesn't make since at this time.
 
#19
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So what is the foot print and cost of this machine? I interested in one that could handle an 8x10 without being too much longer then 9 or 10 ft.
Space is very limited for us and machinery that can't handle an 8x10 doesn't make since at this time.
If you are serious, send me an exact footprint with your wish list of options to:

tom@centrumforce.com
 
#25
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So after you surface clean a glueback rug, then you rinse and squeeze it with this thing, does it go in a wringer then? Or is it ready to go right onto the drying rack?
 

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