Polyester chenille

Jim Pemberton

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Jim Pemberton
You can clean any chenille with HWE, but natural fiber ones will distort badly. Usually they get so dirty you haven’t a choice.

Why do you think it’s polyester? If it’s on a tag, that’s the filling material, not the chenille face material.

If you did a burn test and know it’s polyester, it will clean up good, but just like polyester carpet, any distortion from usage will be permanent.

You just won’t make it worse.
 

Papa John

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John Stewart
You can clean any chenille with HWE, but natural fiber ones will distort badly. Usually they get so dirty you haven’t a choice.

Why do you think it’s polyester?
The manufacturers website says its polyester chenille and gave it a cleaning code of S.

Should I inform the customer that the nap is currently laying in random directions. After cleaning and brushing the nap will be in uniform lines which will disappear after regular use?
 

DAT

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Did 2 brown polyester chenille couches on friday. It was really easy. Lots of milk spills. Cleaned up real easy too. Was done in 45 min and made $220
 

Jim Pemberton

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The manufacturers website says its polyester chenille and gave it a cleaning code of S.

Should I inform the customer that the nap is currently laying in random directions. After cleaning and brushing the nap will be in uniform lines which will disappear after regular use?
The reasoning behind those codes, no matter what I’ve been told by manufacturers, escapes me. This should clean safely and well, but I would make no guarantees regarding the texture.

It’s going to act a lot like polyester carpet does with traffic areas.
 
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The Great Oz

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Cleaning codes are meant to show if the dyes used are colorfast to spotting and cleaning agents. That is all.
 

The Great Oz

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Yep. Professional cleaners sometimes laugh at the tags or ignore them, but they're not meant for you.

Cleaning code labels are only required in some States, so not all furniture will have one. I've seen guys at furniture plants apply W tags to some furniture and S tags to others, with all of the tagged furniture having been built at the same time and covered with the same fabric. If the employees don't know what the tag is for, why would anyone else?
 

Chet

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We always pre-test all upholstery, any chenille can distort. So test clean the side of a cushion, inside back or an area that customer is ok with. I will use whatever cleaning agent(s) I plan on using and the agitation technique I will be using, then I will give it a good hot chop stroke more aggressively than I will be cleaning with. Then groom it, get it dry with an air mover and a hairdryer and inspect from all directions and make sure it looks and feels the same as an area you didn't test.
We always stroke with or against the nap consistently so we don't get a criss-cross pattern that is nearly impossible to remove.

We use this same test on all upholstery and you will find that 90%+ of it can be hwe safely. All manufacturers put unrealistic cleaning codes on upholstery so they aren't held liable.
 

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