Sqft estimate for a gal. of encap concentrate

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#34
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Another excellent question.

First of all, don't flip the pads over. The worn side won't stick as well to the velcro. Run the FiberPlus pads til they wear down to about 1/4" thickness. Then replace. Be careful not to run through them to expose the velcro. You should get about 7,000-10,000 sq ft per installation of pads. That's a pretty fair average. YMV due to of variables - such as coarseness of the carpet, speed you run the Cimex, etc.

Another question we sometimes hear is about cleaning the FiberPlus pads the end of a job. Don't worry about cleaning them (unless you're doing a rat nasty). The pads get perpetually flushed while you're cleaning. The solution flows through the pads. So they're constantly being rinsed. They'll turn a light gray. But they shouldn't require rinsing after a job (as long as the carpet's in the normal soil range).
 
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4 to 5 gallons. I just did 11k sqf andwent theough 2 gallons. So three at the minimum. I also went heavy is some bad areas so I probably used more than needed. B it man. Want a good payday that was.
 
#36
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Another excellent question.

First of all, don't flip the pads over. The worn side won't stick as well to the velcro. Run the FiberPlus pads til they wear down to about 1/4" thickness. Then replace. Be careful not to run through them to expose the velcro. You should get about 7,000-10,000 sq ft per installation of pads. That's a pretty fair average. YMV due to of variables - such as coarseness of the carpet, speed you run the Cimex, etc.

Another question we sometimes hear is about cleaning the FiberPlus pads the end of a job. Don't worry about cleaning them (unless you're doing a rat nasty). The pads get perpetually flushed while you're cleaning. The solution flows through the pads. So they're constantly being rinsed. They'll turn a light gray. But they shouldn't require rinsing after a job (as long as the carpet's in the normal soil range).
Do you have any opinion on the amount of sqft the SuerZorb pads will do? I was curious and pushed them to the limits a few weeks ago. Notmay inchange them out every 300-500 sqft. I ended up pushing itntonabout 1500 sq ft and that thing just kept soaking up.
 
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I haven't worked a lot with the Superzorbs. But I can share what I've observed with the MicroBeast bonnets. Microfiber bonnets behave a little different than Superzorbs (but they should be fairly similar). MicroBeast's pull up a good quantity of soil and they rinse easier. Whereas the Superzor's tend to be thirstier. MicroBeast bonnets can go 1,000+ sq ft before changing/flipping the bonnet (on light to medium soiled carpet). For carpet with heavy soil, you'll normally average a few hundred sq ft per side of the bonnet. I'll let someone else comment on the rates for Superzorbs - like I said, my experience cleaning with them is more limited.
 
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#38
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I haven't worked a lot with the Superzorbs. But I can share what I've observed with the MicroBeast bonnets. Microfiber bonnets behave a little different than Superzorbs (but their fairly similar). MicroBeast's tend to pull a good quantity of soil and they rinse easier. Whereas the Superzor's tend to be thirstier. MicroBeast bonnets can go 1,000+ sq ft before changing/flipping the bonnet (on light to medium soiled carpet). For carpet with heavy soil, you'll normally average a few hundred sq ft per side of the bonnet.
I just have one microbeast pad and use it just to scrub. Seems to be good for that. Pretty dang impressed with those SuperZorbs. So are you saying that the Microbeast can also be use as the primary extraction pad as well as a scrubber pad?
 
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Ready to Use gallon cost is what you need to figure and not cost of concentrate. It is better to have strong coffee and dilute with water for those who like weak coffee. You can not make weak coffee strong again. In the same way, Rick and Bridgepoint make a strong double strength formula diluted at a 1 to 32. If you want to make it cheaper, you add the water, don't expect us to do that and ruin it for those who do not like weak coffee. When you do the math, dilute our Encapuclean Green DS to whatever dilution you need to match the ready to use gallon cost of whatever you are currently using. If you need to dilute 1 to 64, then do so as we have a true double strength formula. We had someone introduce a triple strength encapsulate a few years ago. I was curious and got a sample. I found out we were actually selling a 6X not 2X formula based on the 3X formula. I dried down the solids and our solids weighed twice as much as the 3X solids. The less concentrated a product then packaging, shipping, labor and overhead represent a higher percentage of cost than in a more concentrated version.
 
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I’ve been using pads that are at least 10 years old. Wash em and use them over and over and over with no wear down in site.

As for the double triple twin siemiese triplets strength formulas....again the just under $12 a gallon concentrate encap cleans the same and it ain’t no pennies of savings.

Get that marketing brick engraved in your brains, out of your brains.
 
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When doing side by side tests, I test solutions at the same ready to use gallon cost. This takes price out of the equation so you can focus on real performance differences. Some want us to sell cheaper products. My response is to add your own water to get the ready to use gallon cost that you want. How do you figure yards per carry by a running back? You divide rushing yards by carries. How do you figure ready to use gallon costs? You divide price by the dilution (1 to 16=17). This is your true cost, not the price you pay for the gallon. If you want to lower your cost add more water.

We sell both Hydrobreak (around $20) at a 1 to 8 dilution and Zone Perfect (around $40)at a 1 to 32 dilution. When you compare ready to use gallon costs Hydrobreak is $2.15 and Zone Perfect is $1.20. Why is that? One gallon of Zone Perfect is about the same yield of four gallons of Hydrobreak. You are paying more since you needed 4 gallons, 4 lids, 4 labels, more labor and overhead, 1 box, and more shipping costs. Buy more concentrated product whenever available.
 
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Peroxide ages and goes sour if not stored properly. This happens to all peroxide products (including the beauty supply stuff) in the year and half to two years shelf life. One major peroxide manufacturer worked for years without success to eliminate or significantly delay this souring. If it is stored in heat then the time frame can be even less. We have a insulated spotting kit for the purpose of protecting shelf life of Red Zone Ready and Stain Zone. The first 2 digits of the batch number indicate the year it was made. I recommend distributors buy reducer & peroxide products in low amounts and on every order to keep fresher stock on hand. Cleaners should do the same. Buying bulk makes sense for most pre-sprays and rinses. However, buying individual gallons or a case at a time makes more sense for reducers and peroxides. I would recommend 2 to 3 month supply on hand for distributors and end users at most. Store in climate controlled areas until needed on the truck. If this is done then these products would get used up with one year before any souring occurs.

However, some may not like the odor of the product if new so they can use what they choose as I am not inclined to significantly alter the performance of a product based on someone's preference. We sell a lot of this product throughout the country including several national franchises. One of the carpet mills shipped multiple cases of Encapuclean O2 to a foreign country to prevent them from having to replace a lot of commercial carpet. O2 works plain and simple. When peroxide products sour, all of them stink plain and simple especially when they have a higher percent of peroxide in the formula. I have been testing some fragrances in some peroxide products to see if it covers up the souring odor. Results to this point have not been conclusive. Adding fragrances to encapsulates can decrease the soil resistance of the residue.
 
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Peroxide ages and goes sour if not stored properly. This happens to all peroxide products (including the beauty supply stuff) in the year and half to two years shelf life. One major peroxide manufacturer worked for years without success to eliminate or significantly delay this souring. If it is stored in heat then the time frame can be even less. We have a insulated spotting kit for the purpose of protecting shelf life of Red Zone Ready and Stain Zone. The first 2 digits of the batch number indicate the year it was made. I recommend distributors buy reducer & peroxide products in low amounts and on every order to keep fresher stock on hand. Cleaners should do the same. Buying bulk makes sense for most pre-sprays and rinses. However, buying individual gallons or a case at a time makes more sense for reducers and peroxides. I would recommend 2 to 3 month supply on hand for distributors and end users at most. Store in climate controlled areas until needed on the truck. If this is done then these products would get used up with one year before any souring occurs.

However, some may not like the odor of the product if new so they can use what they choose as I am not inclined to significantly alter the performance of a product based on someone's preference. We sell a lot of this product throughout the country including several national franchises. One of the carpet mills shipped multiple cases of Encapuclean O2 to a foreign country to prevent them from having to replace a lot of commercial carpet. O2 works plain and simple. When peroxide products sour, all of them stink plain and simple especially when they have a higher percent of peroxide in the formula. I have been testing some fragrances in some peroxide products to see if it covers up the souring odor. Results to this point have not been conclusive. Adding fragrances to encapsulates can decrease the soil resistance of the residue.
I noticed the souring of smell sometime but it smell more ammoniated sometimes. The effectiveness hasnt diminished. I found that when i use compound with it, smell very fresh in the end. Once dry, the smell is gone altogether. All peroxide base chem whether for cut and scrap or cleaning always has a stink to them..
 
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Tom, I have noticed very sour smells on one step peroxide products. I normally use the peroxide/ammonia combination products for stain removal, (I buy a gallon of each at a time) and mix into a spray bottle or refill my dual chamber bottle. I use the Bridgepoint o2 encap for low moisture cleaning and haven't noticed any off odors from it. I mix it and use it mainly in a Sprayborg. Did a great job for me a little while ago in optometry store where they had a large coffee stain. Took it right out.
 

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