The Pro's Choice Color Modifying Kit

Matt Wood

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Is this a temporary or permanent fix for bleach spots and color loss from urine?

It looks just like women's makeup or crayons, but the process they use in the video looks like it does a good job. Can someone explain the liquid fix vs the crayon fix?

 

ruff

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Since the excess dye can be removed by the solvent, it stands to reason that the color fix is not permanent and would be removed by solvents and possibly detergents.

Crayons are pigments, which means that they cover the stain. An example would be a stain on a painted wall that you paint over to hide.

Dyes are transparent and you need to build the final color through adding different amounts of red, yellow and blue.

Their system uses the above principles but I would assume is not permanent. I never tried it or saw how well it lasts.
 

Rick J

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Is this a temporary or permanent fix for bleach spots and color loss from urine?

It looks just like women's makeup or crayons, but the process they use in the video looks like it does a good job. Can someone explain the liquid fix vs the crayon fix?

I bought a set quite some time ago. Specifically to try and correct those olefins, and polys that they say can not be damaged by harsh chems but do.
I could not get any noticeable improvement on those. It was difficult to get any color onto the fibers from the piece of whatever the things are.

20180123_120959[1].jpg
 

Rick J

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You can't dye olefin or polyester with acid dyes.
I do color correction all the time on nylon.

Which is why I thought I would give the cosmetics a try. Just a , a see if I can do any improvement, effort.
Mostly to see if I could. Bugs me that I can't do anything with these.
Could not get enough of the cosmetic onto the fiber to make a difference.

I have gotten disperse or union dye in the past to try as well.
At least I think I have . RIT dye from grocery store?

Now that I am thinking about it, usually the damage is purplish hue on the polys, and olefins. Should just get a variety of mustards to put the yellow back in and get back to tan. :biggrin::biggrin: LOL!
 

Papa John

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Now that I am thinking about it, usually the damage is purplish hue on the polys, and olefins. Should just get a variety of mustards to put the yellow back in and get back to tan. :biggrin::biggrin: LOL!
That will work, or use a yellow crayon.
 

Rick J

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They do make dyes for polyester now.
Isn't that essentially what the products such as Dinge away / Blend and mend are. ?:errf:
Tried the Dinge when it first came out . When I used it the place smelled very strongly like latex paint. , only much stonger And noticed no improvement, and used quite a lot on the area.s
 

ruff

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I thought Dinge Away increases the particles that reflect light, making the scratched areas look better due to more light reflection.
 
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Rick J

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I thought Dinge Away increases the particles that reflect light, making the scratched areas look better due to more light reflection.
I think it is meant to fill in the scratched surface of the abraded fiber. But it does come in different colors.


Sort of like a stone. Dry it may not be too pretty, but get it wet and it looks better??

It reminded me of paint.
 

Papa John

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Isn't that essentially what the products such as Dinge away / Blend and mend are. ?:errf:
Tried the Dinge when it first came out . When I used it the place smelled very strongly like latex paint. , only much stonger And noticed no improvement, and used quite a lot on the area.s
No, there are other dyes available from other sources when u take their dye class.
 
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Willy P

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What ever happened to ponytail that used to dye the white house? And don't forget Steve Mathie and the Ropers........
Too many shysters.
 
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What ever happened to ponytail that used to dye the white house? And don't forget Steve Mathie and the Ropers........
Too many shysters.
That fecking ROPER, should'a used ROPE around his thieving neck.

His site still states: "100% Money Back Guarantee. "

Lying, thieving bastard.


With crayons, it's essential that you use the CORRECT crayon (petroleum), and melt it into the fiber.

Ask Tony Wheelwright. 😉

:yoda:😉
 
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Cleanworks

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That fecking ROPER, should'a used ROPE around his thieving neck.

His site still states: "100% Money Back Guarantee. "

Lying, thieving bastard.


With crayons, it's essential that you use the CORRECT crayon (petroleum), and melt it into the fiber.

Ask Tony Wheelwright. 😉

:yoda:😉
Oil pastels, not permanent but a great temporary fix for olefin or polyester.
 
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SamIam

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Oil pastels, not permanent but a great temporary fix for olefin or polyester.
Ron, with respect, Oil or wax crayons are different to petroleum crayons.

There are many different types of crayons, including chalk, that can be used (temporarily), for synthetic carpets.

What to mix them with, ( such as boot polish for Sisal, & cornflour), is what must be tried until one finds what works.

Many times, these tests can be permanent, depending on the operators skill.

Just my thoughts.

:yoda: :very_drunk:
 
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Rick J

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Ron, with respect, Oil or wax crayons are different to petroleum crayons.

There are many different types of crayons, including chalk, that can be used (temporarily), for synthetic carpets.

What to mix them with, ( such as boot polish for Sisal, & cornflour), is what must be tried until one finds what works.

Many times, these tests can be permanent, depending on the operators skill.

Just my thoughts.

:yoda: :very_drunk:
which makes me consider my earlier toungue in cheek sarcasm,comment about mustards even more LOL We know how hard mustard stains are to remove
 

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