The truth about zerorez

Jimmy L

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Just use a weak ammonia solution in your TM jug.
It completely evaporates and .............doesn't leave a residue, self neutralizes .

And I said weak............no fear of ammonia smell
 
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scotty747

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I read the ingrediants on my kids baby formula. Guess what it contained? Yep Sodium Hydroxide. Why its there I don't know but I didn't want my baby drinking it when I use it for degreasing engines, stripping floors, and the like. Also don't want to leave any in my customers carpet.
 

Hack Attack

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Just use a weak ammonia solution in your TM jug.
It completely evaporates and .............doesn't leave a residue, self neutralizes .

And I said weak............no fear of ammonia smell
and if you play with the dilutions alongdide hydrogen peroxide in your HF you can remove redstains with your prespray
 
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Matt Wood

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@Tom Forsythe what's your thoughts on this. After all, you do sell them clean free rinse. I found this SDS sheet online and it doesn't have any lye in it.

I remember when I looked into getting into the franchise and I asked the salesman about lye. He told me they don't use lye, but they use sodium carbonate in their stupid rust making process. Whether he was lying or not...I don't know, because food grade lye is used in several types of food and cleaners and is safe. Either way, I was pissed that he didn't like my offer of purchasing the franchise, yet using my current equipment with CleanFree rinse and NOT replacing my equipment every 3 YEARS due to rust and premature wear.
-From my research, I found that the electrotechnology that sends currents through the water creates sodium carbonate, which is a step not needed when you can just add it to your rinse. Totally stupid and a waste of money. I'd like the owner of Zerorez that owns both the Atlanta and Greenville to come on here and explain how he's able to replace over 60 truck mounts and water electrowhatever units ($80K Each combined) every 3 and 5 years and still make a decent profit after all the other expenses are brought in
 

Tom Forsythe

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A point about sodium hydroxide. It is used in small amounts to modify pH. It is used in almost all of the high pH liquid pre-sprays on the market. If the pH is below 11 then it is used in small amounts. In short, the amount used in any formula varies significantly. A formula can have sodium hydroxide and be considered green if pH is 10 or below. It is processed from natural sources. Potassium hydroxide comes from potash in various places like southern Utah and Saskatchewan (close to the residence of my brother-in-law.

In powdered formulas, sodium hydroxide is typically combined with sodium silicate to form sodium metasilicate. The soidum silicate part neutralizes the corrosive impact of sodium hydroxide on metals. We use the sodium metasilicate as a corrosion inhibitor in rinse formulations. In powders the three basic components are sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP with pH <10), sodium metasilicate with pH > 12 and sodium carbonate with pH 11. Cost of sodium carbonate is X, sodium metasilicate is 1.5X and STPP is 4X. Your powdered pre-sprays below 10 will be more expensive than your powdered pre-sprays above 12. Most of the newer pre-sprays on the market use alot of sodium carbonate providing lower cost. Any tile & grout formula which leaves powdered residue is generally a result of too much sodium carbonate and too little STPP in the formula.
 

Matt Wood

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A point about sodium hydroxide. It is used in small amounts to modify pH. It is used in almost all of the high pH liquid pre-sprays on the market. If the pH is below 11 then it is used in small amounts. In short, the amount used in any formula varies significantly. A formula can have sodium hydroxide and be considered green if pH is 10 or below. It is processed from natural sources. Potassium hydroxide comes from potash in various places like southern Utah and Saskatchewan (close to the residence of my brother-in-law.

In powdered formulas, sodium hydroxide is typically combined with sodium silicate to form sodium metasilicate. The soidum silicate part neutralizes the corrosive impact of sodium hydroxide on metals. We use the sodium metasilicate as a corrosion inhibitor in rinse formulations. In powders the three basic components are sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP with pH <10), sodium metasilicate with pH > 12 and sodium carbonate with pH 11. Cost of sodium carbonate is X, sodium metasilicate is 1.5X and STPP is 4X. Your powdered pre-sprays below 10 will be more expensive than your powdered pre-sprays above 12. Most of the newer pre-sprays on the market use alot of sodium carbonate providing lower cost. Any tile & grout formula which leaves powdered residue is generally a result of too much sodium carbonate and too little STPP in the formula.
That’s the best explanation I’ve ever read about this topic.
Thanks Tom

Now somebody explain why they feel they should use that electrostupid machine that turns these vans and truckmounts into a $80k pile of rust.
 

Hack Attack

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how many easily recognisable cc franchises do you reckon you have stateside?

We've got 2, and every now and then it will look like there might be a 3rd or 4th. But a year or so later nup disappeared with the occasional hold out branch
 
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