WHAT! You cleaned a wool area rug with an Orbot?

#31
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Indeed a Karastan, which means good wool and well dyed. Not much to worry about cleaning this rug type - in the shop. It looks good and the rug is unlikely to have any negative issues with the chosen on-site cleaning method.


Skip this part if you don't want the lecture. (Marty version: If the customer wants you to do something you're not comfortable with, don't do it. It's better for you financially.)

For next time:

The one person you shouldn't lie to is yourself. You had options other than to clean on site. You wanted to clean the rug, you wanted to get some more money from the customer, even if it was less than it should have been for the risks you took. At this point it looks like you got away with it, End of Story.
We Zipper them when they won't allow us to clean them off site.
Never do something dumb because a customer wants you to do something dumb.. They'll either allow you to do it right or find another patsy, and that patsy will be a step closer to being out of business. A win either way.

That size rug retails for over $3k, so make sure you CAN afford to buy it. The Pergo on the floor will come in at about that price too, plus installation.

Unless I had a video of her explaining the floor damage was pre-existing and that she wanted the rug cleaned in place, I'd have some trouble sleeping. Anytime in the next three years she can come after you for the damage, or move out and tell the landlord you did it. We've had many scammers do variations of this over the years. The insurance company almost always rolls over and pays, so writing a check often becomes cheaper than paying higher rates or going to court.

PS: Encapping in a home is always wrong. Always.
 
#32
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When looking on the back, Silk will have a higher knot count and tighter (smaller) knots.

Some people will never send the rug to be cleaned off site, either because of inconvenience and or price.
One can stick to their guns and risk potentially losing the client or provide the service. As long as they know what they are doing, are able to substantially reduce the chance of damage and are clear with the clients as to how clean it can really get. They are providing a valuable service.

Of course, later on and on their own time, they can always

Don-Quixote-Windmill.jpg
Are you don?

Am I panza? :winky:
 
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#35
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Does using an encap product on a rug (or even just water) is really safer?
Yes, safer- On account of less moisture and less chance of delayed bleeding. Also no heat, though you can HWE with (warm-ish) not hot water.
Not safer- As most Encap products are alkaline or neutral ph (at dilution) So they do not act as dye stabilizers, as some acidic side rinses will. Also, I wonder what happens to the ph once the water evaporates. If it rises, that can cause an issue or a future issue.
Not safer- On account of potential dye transfer through crocking.
Low moisture (through faster drying) is safer than high moisture as far as dye bleed is concerned. It would make sense to clean a lightly soiled, loose dye rug this way. It is possible to HWE and not use much water. It isn't accurate to say you're cleaning with encap.

Dye "stabilizers" don't stabilize dye, just help keep unstable dye from moving into fiber that has less dye. They don't always work. Dye stabilizer and a lot of rinsing can remove enough excess dye that future cleaning can be done normally.

Chemical that isn't intended for wool cleaning is typically buffered to make it as effective as possible in the presence of higher acidic soil loads. If the alkaline product is not buffered (like a designed for wool traffic lane cleaner) the acidic soils will reduce the pH through the cleaning process. Buffered high-alkaline residue can cause felting in traffic areas and dyebleed during future cleanings.

Merry Christmas!
 
#38
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Low moisture (through faster drying) is safer than high moisture as far as dye bleed is concerned. It would make sense to clean a lightly soiled, loose dye rug this way. It is possible to HWE and not use much water. It isn't accurate to say you're cleaning with encap.

Dye "stabilizers" don't stabilize dye, just help keep unstable dye from moving into fiber that has less dye. They don't always work. Dye stabilizer and a lot of rinsing can remove enough excess dye that future cleaning can be done normally.

Chemical that isn't intended for wool cleaning is typically buffered to make it as effective as possible in the presence of higher acidic soil loads. If the alkaline product is not buffered (like a designed for wool traffic lane cleaner) the acidic soils will reduce the pH through the cleaning process. Buffered high-alkaline residue can cause felting in traffic areas and dyebleed during future cleanings.

Merry Christmas!

So no Cimex in the D.A. Burns fleet I take it?
 
#39
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Scampooing in a residential is nothing more than you using a kirby vacuum scampoo attachment. They use Scott's shampoo.

Done it years ago in my own home, vacuumed everyday and it still looked like crap in a month.
 
#42
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LOL I get that but some clients want convenience over thoroughly clean.

I think they would do next day but when we tell them a week you can see it in their face that it's not going to work.

Others don't care, they schedule other services around that time while we have their rugs.
So let me ask you something...
Do you ever leave just some mold in a home with water damage over throughly clean just for convenience???
Everyone would want to get into their damaged home a day or two earlier.
 
#43
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Yes. Not often but it is their home or business.

10 years ago we dried down a large area of offices in a hospital. We suspected a possibility of mold in some walls from a preexisting loss. They would not let us open the walls up but wanted them dry. We drew negative pressure on the walls using HEPA air scrubbers and adaptadri manifolds.

We had very good documentation, thermals, pictures and a refusal of recommendations signed by the facilities manager.

Similar instances happen in homes. Homeowner strapped with policy limits will decide not to remove drywall affected by sewage or mold. We document, have the appropriate paperwork signed and provide the next best services. MMR instead of removal of mold, wash down and biocides instead of removal.

Two choices. Find a way to provide the services the clients desire or walk away. We will work with those that seem normal and walk from those that don't.
 
#44
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Yes. Not often but it is their home or business.

10 years ago we dried down a large area of offices in a hospital. We suspected a possibility of mold in some walls from a preexisting loss. They would not let us open the walls up but wanted them dry. We drew negative pressure on the walls using HEPA air scrubbers and adaptadri manifolds.

We had very good documentation, thermals, pictures and a refusal of recommendations signed by the facilities manager.

Similar instances happen in homes. Homeowner strapped with policy limits will decide not to remove drywall affected by sewage or mold. We document, have the appropriate paperwork signed and provide the next best services. MMR instead of removal of mold, wash down and biocides instead of removal.

Two choices. Find a way to provide the services the clients desire or walk away. We will work with those that seem normal and walk from those that don't.
Some people want the steak, some just want the sizzle.
 
#45
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I live on gravel road, I its seems my vehicle is always dirty. We have a car wash at our shop, its takes 5 minutes. Now I know its not as goos as hand wash but my vehicle gets dirty so quickly I'm washing it weekly.

Dan on the other hand has a nice sponge and bucket there. He hand washes and only uses the car wash to rinse. It takes 20-30 minutes and it is more thoroughly washed.

For me it's serves a purpose, my vehicle looks clean (I know there is a better method) and most of the soil is removed. It is convenient and fairly effective. Not the best but I only hand wash once or twice a year before waxing.

Those customers for whatever reason will likely only send their rug in plant when they move or when they refinish the floor. No matter how much you try to educate them on their decision, they want a different service than you are trying to sell them.
 
#46
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Sometimes with some customers it comes down to a lesser level of cleaning or no cleaning at all. When those are the options, the rug, the client and the cleaner may all be better off if the rug gets cleaned than if it does not get cleaned.

How successful would GM be if it stood on principal and refused to sell any car other than its top of the line Cadillac?
 
#47
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I get the idea Scott. I personally would have a tough time selling "close enough" service to those that won't pay for better, mainly because those people can complain that whatever you did to meet their budget still wasn't good enough. That's been my experience - no good deed goes unpunished.

How successful would GM be if it stood on principal and refused to sell any car other than its top of the line Cadillac?
What if we change this analogy up a bit and say,
How successful would GM be if it stood on principle and refused to sell crappy cars?

The willingness to produce bad cars led them to bankruptcy, but what if they only sold good cars? They could command more dollars per car, be more profitable, not wasted their time and money building the bad cars, and would have built a respectable name for themselves.

Maybe if they only built Cadillacs, a Cadillac would still be the Cadillac of the car industry!
 
#48
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Sometimes with some customers it comes down to a lesser level of cleaning or no cleaning at all. When those are the options, the rug, the client and the cleaner may all be better off if the rug gets cleaned than if it does not get cleaned.

How successful would GM be if it stood on principal and refused to sell any car other than its top of the line Cadillac?
Love to have you over my shop one day so I can educate you on what clean is.
 
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#50
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I think Bryan may have the infamous- "having too many employees" syndrome.
One out of 70 employees goofs once every once in a while and immediately there a new and improved regulation book. Read chapter 37, paragraph 12, fifth sentence from the bottom. Yes. There will be a test tomorrow.

Given, Bryan, due to having so many employees, having to deal with and correct so many problem situations and his natural intelligence, developed a tremendous knowledge. However, like any large company with many employees, it seems like they tend to over react and over regulate. Hard to train and re-train and re-re-train again all these employees.

How many here (O/O) had complaints about on location cleaning? Me- 0. That is zero, Bryan.
How many here bled a carpet due to on location cleaning? Me- 0. That is zero, Bryan.

How about others here? That have to deal with real clients who vote with their feet and wallet. And don't use words like ":eek:ur company policy is.....".

P.S. Bryan, could you please provide us with an abridged, GM analogy for simpletons?
 

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