Why I (almost) always prevacuum.

Jim Pemberton

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All of that material is feeding and breeding grounds for the bacteria that leaves a place with a "doggie"/"dirty sock" odor after cleaning.
 

Jim Pemberton

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When I was still a faithful member of the Church of IICRC, the more forward thinking of my brethren used a term:

"M.U.S."

It stood for "Made Up Stuff" It was used when we questioned things taught that were repeated over the years as sacred, but had no scientific proof.

One example of MUS was "Every 18 degrees over 118 degrees of temperture doubles cleaning power". It sounded good, and was based on sound physics, but did not apply to cleaning power.

In one of the Scriptures of the Church of IICRC , there is a statement that post grooming is to be done to align the fibers to speed the drying process. While first brought forth by one of the IICRC Prophets, I never knew that it was tested to see if it were a fact.

It seems to make sense that groomed, upright fibers would dry quicker than matted ones, but I don't know that there is science to support that.

If true, I would consider it to be an important step.

If not, then its a matter of appearance only.

I'm not rendering an opinion, because as an IICRC Agnostic, I just don't know....
 

Cleanworks

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When I was still a faithful member of the Church of IICRC, the more forward thinking of my brethren used a term:

"M.U.S."

It stood for "Made Up Stuff" It was used when we questioned things taught that were repeated over the years as sacred, but had no scientific proof.

One example of MUS was "Every 18 degrees over 118 degrees of temperture doubles cleaning power". It sounded good, and was based on sound physics, but did not apply to cleaning power.

In one of the Scriptures of the Church of IICRC , there is a statement that post grooming is to be done to align the fibers to speed the drying process. While first brought forth by one of the IICRC Prophets, I never knew that it was tested to see if it were a fact.

It seems to make sense that groomed, upright fibers would dry quicker than matted ones, but I don't know that there is science to support that.

If true, I would consider it to be an important step.

If not, then its a matter of appearance only.

I'm not rendering an opinion, because as an IICRC Agnostic, I just don't know....
If there was a difference in drying times, I'm sure it would be minimal. I groom more often than not, both for the appearance and to rake in protector if applied. Just leaves the carpet with a nice finished look.
 

encapman

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Glad to see that "some" cleaners pre-vacuum; considering that roughly 80% of the soil in carpet is dry soil. Dry soil, plus moisture, equals mud. It's a lot easier to remove dry soil while it's still dry.
 

Jim Pemberton

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MSU has a slightly different S than MUS.
The "S" can mean either "stuff" or ...the other stuff.

Most of the IICRC heretics did not say "stuff" in private conversation, but I felt it was better for this discussion.
 

Loren Egland

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Glad to see that "some" cleaners pre-vacuum; considering that roughly 80% of the soil in carpet is dry soil. Dry soil, plus moisture, equals mud. It's a lot easier to remove dry soil while it's still dry.
Just for the sake of argument, and if the 80% estimate is on point, it stands to reason that 20% of the remaining soil is also dry. (rather than already wet and thus already mud) (The homeowner can remove 80% of dry soil without calling a professional carpet cleaner.)

In order to remove the 20% of dry soil left in the carpet, the professional carpet cleaner adds water and makes mud so that the soils can easily be removed from residential carpet. If making mud makes soils harder to remove, why steam clean at all? Maybe using water actually removes more soil (now mud), cleans better?

Chances are that the same time spent dry vacuuming could be used for additional flushing with a rotary jet extractor on some jobs, resulting in more soils being removed and a cleaner carpet. Liquid brushing/flushing movement and all sides agitation, verses, air movement only and agitation. What erodes more quickly, wind or flood?

If I have a pair of pants with two pockets and I put 8 ounces of soil in one pocket and two ounces of soil in another pocket, the pants are carrying all ten ounces of soil. The pants would have the same amount of soil if I put 10 ounces of soil in 1 pocket and no ounces of soil in the other pocket.

If hot water extraction did not pull out more than 20% of the soils, then you would not see any difference in the waste tank debris whether you pre-vac or not. (you know that is not the case) In fact, why not dry vac after wet cleaning to remove the so-called “dry soil”? If you see more gunk in your waste tank or filter if you don’t pre-vac, aren’t you just putting all the soils in one pocket (waste tank) of your pants instead of soil in two pockets (one pocket waste tank, one pocket vacuum bag), so to speak?

Yes, I know there may be times to pre-vac. I’m just saying.... :)

Loren
 
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