Is hardballs protector...

Lamesalegend

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I haven't used hardball"s in awhile. Hardball is good, But My go to is now Cobbs Solvent Protector. They are similar in they don't need to be diluted. Cobb's is also great for sealing/impregnating grout and Tile. Apparently their Stone and tile impregnator is the same stuff as the carpet protector. So it's nice to just have one protector on the truck.
The Solvent Protector is a little less than their Ultraseal. Ultraseal has 40% more flourochemical so if you apply the Solvent Protector at 600sqft per gallon (Solvent Protector's directions say 1000sqft per gallon) you have the same performance as the Ultraseal does at 1000 sqft per gallon. No real reason I switched from Hardball except maybe price ( always free shipping when you order a case) and convenience since I often order other Cobb products. Also I prefer the solvent based carrier over the waterbased, in my head the solvent based would give a better chance for even coverage if my spraying/application isn't perfectly even. I think Cobbs is the best value 4 gallons for $106 shipped
 
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sassyotto

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I still use Hardball. We use to use Carpet Guard, the same as FabriCoat which is used by fine furniture stores to apply to new upholstery. When the cost all of a sudden doubled we had to look elsewhere, so we did a test on 7 or 8 different protectors (it was about 15 years ago).

We took a large section of used carpet and cleaned it. then sectioned it off and applied the different protectors and left it in the shop for a couple of months.
1. We then looked at each section and compared how each section resoiled.
2. We then applied liquid to each section and notated the repellancy
3. Then we recleaned the carpet and compared how easy it was to clean up.
4. We then reapplied liquid to each section and again notated repellency (how much protector can be removed in cleaning)
5. Finally notated which section looked best.

The answer was the one protected by Hardball and we have been using it ever since. I buy the Lemon Scent.

A lot of times I see people ask "what do you use" on chat boards. Sometimes you have to take the time and do some testing to convince yourself.

BTW I had it on my list of things to do to ask Mike if it can be used to seal grout as I just got into tile cleaning.
 
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dealtimeman

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I haven't used hardball"s in awhile. Hardball is good, But My go to is now Cobbs Solvent Protector. They are similar in they don't need to be diluted. Cobb's is also great for sealing/impregnating grout and Tile. Apparently their Stone and tile impregnator is the same stuff as the carpet protector. So it's nice to just have one protector on the truck.
The Solvent Protector is a little less than their Ultraseal. Ultraseal has 40% more flourochemical so if you apply the Solvent Protector at 600sqft per gallon (Solvent Protector's directions say 1000sqft per gallon) you have the same performance as the Ultraseal does at 1000 sqft per gallon. No real reason I switched from Hardball except maybe price ( always free shipping when you order a case) and convenience since I often order other Cobb products. Also I prefer the solvent based carrier over the waterbased, in my head the solvent based would give a better chance for even coverage if my spraying/application isn't perfectly even. I think Cobbs is the best value 4 gallons for $106 shipped

Same here! Just good stuff..

BUT PROPER PERSONEL PROTECTION NEEDS TO BE USED IN CONFINED SPACES LIKE SHOWERS OR YOU WILL THROWN FORVA LOOP.
 

tmiklethun

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I haven't used hardball"s in awhile. Hardball is good, But My go to is now Cobbs Solvent Protector. They are similar in they don't need to be diluted. Cobb's is also great for sealing/impregnating grout and Tile. Apparently their Stone and tile impregnator is the same stuff as the carpet protector. So it's nice to just have one protector on the truck.
The Solvent Protector is a little less than their Ultraseal. Ultraseal has 40% more flourochemical so if you apply the Solvent Protector at 600sqft per gallon (Solvent Protector's directions say 1000sqft per gallon) you have the same performance as the Ultraseal does at 1000 sqft per gallon. No real reason I switched from Hardball except maybe price ( always free shipping when you order a case) and convenience since I often order other Cobb products. Also I prefer the solvent based carrier over the waterbased, in my head the solvent based would give a better chance for even coverage if my spraying/application isn't perfectly even. I think Cobbs is the best value 4 gallons for $106 shipped

Thanks, but did you have a typo. I don't see where it costs $106 for four gallons shipped. What I see is like $36 a gallon. Am I looking at the right product?
 

Lamesalegend

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Tom Forsythe

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All water-based protectors sold 15 years ago have different formulas today, with one potential exception, Scotchgard. Teflon Advanced has gone through 4 changes in the last 15 years going from excellent to good to average to excellent. The current Advanced Protector with Teflon has outstanding oil repellency. If you use water based then it is time to test again if it has been longer than 3 years.

In a couple of years all solvent-based protectors sold 15 years ago will have different formulas based on regulatory changes once the supply of C8 made before Jan. 1, 2016 runs out. From what I see of the C6 options, many will not be happy with the strong odor and the low flash points (around 60 degree F vs. current 120 degree F).
 

Tom Forsythe

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Tom do you think its possible to create a water base slop and mop grout sealer?
The challenge is not the performance, but the speed of penetration into the grout lines and spread across the tiles so that it is a fast process. Also any remaining residue on the tiles would be more evident using a water base than solvent base. Thanks, for the question as I have an idea for a potential starting point. However, for every product introduced there are a few that died in the lab.
 
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Jim Pemberton

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When I was a kid, I met a janitor who claimed that by adding his urine to every coat of floor finish it would make the floor have an extra shine.

I asked my father if he heard of such a thing.

He said that the "process" likely started the first time his boss caught him urinating in the floor finish bucket.
 

roro

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Good thing your Dad lived in a post soap era Jim
Urine For Cleaning


In the grand scheme of things, soap is a relatively recent invention. Before that, people had to make do with what they had on hand, and in ancient Rome, if you wanted your clothes really clean, you used urine.

A Roman laundry was called a fullo, and it employed boys who would walk on clothing that was submerged in a mixture of water and urine. The urine was partly from animals but mostly human, collected in jugs placed on street corners for citizens to make their contributions. The fulloes placed such a great demand for urine on cities that in some areas, they were required to pay a tax on the urine they collected.

Because of the harsh treatment, the garments were often further treated with other substances to restore their color; white linens were rubbed with a white dirt called cimolian. In ancient Rome, urine was also used for cleaning something else: teeth. Teeth whitening used urine to bleach away stains.
 

DAT

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Good thing your Dad lived in a post soap era Jim
Urine For Cleaning


In the grand scheme of things, soap is a relatively recent invention. Before that, people had to make do with what they had on hand, and in ancient Rome, if you wanted your clothes really clean, you used urine.

A Roman laundry was called a fullo, and it employed boys who would walk on clothing that was submerged in a mixture of water and urine. The urine was partly from animals but mostly human, collected in jugs placed on street corners for citizens to make their contributions. The fulloes placed such a great demand for urine on cities that in some areas, they were required to pay a tax on the urine they collected.

Because of the harsh treatment, the garments were often further treated with other substances to restore their color; white linens were rubbed with a white dirt called cimolian. In ancient Rome, urine was also used for cleaning something else: teeth. Teeth whitening used urine to bleach away stains.
I bet people with renal failure, their urine would clean better.
 

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