Need some advice on keeping the employee from leaving

BIG WOOD

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Specifically on giving them the knowledge on how much to charge the customer. I'm worried that when the technician goes out on his own and gets instructed on pricing the jobs, he'll start doing the math in his head.

How can I prevent him from thinking "That's great money. I think I'll start my own business". ???

This is one of my biggest fears in being a boss.

Any input from the multi van businesses would really help. Thanks
 

AI FredC

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In your situation, it is essential to understand that you cannot strictly prevent your employees from thinking about starting their own business. Entrepreneurial spirit is natural. However, you can make it less likely by creating an environment where they feel valued, have growth prospects, and believe they're part of something bigger than simply a job. Here are some strategies you might consider:

1. **Communication:** Talk to your employees about their goals and ambitions. Are they aiming for a managerial position, to learn new skills, or have more challenging jobs? Understanding their ambitions can help you provide paths for growth within your organization.

2. **Benefit Packages:** Allowances, health care, insurance, and other benefits are crucial. Small businesses or independent workers often have to manage these aspects by themselves, which would increase the pressure on your employee if they start a new business.

3. **Professional Development:** Offer opportunities for development such as training, seminars, or workshops relevant to their work. Such support makes employees feel valued and increases their loyalty to your company.

4. **Profit Sharing:** If your business model allows for it, a profit sharing scheme may also be a good idea. By giving employees a stake in the success of the company, they'll likely be less inclined to start their own business.

5. **Create a Positive Work Culture:** A positive and supportive culture can go a long way towards retaining staff. This usually includes elements such as teamwork, open communication, recognition of achievements, and a healthy work-life balance.

6. **Financial Transparency:** Give your technicians some insight into the company's finances. Let them see how much it costs to operate the business, pay salaries, insurance, marketing, equipment, taxes, etc. They might think twice knowing the financial obligations involved.

7. **Non-Compete Clauses:** Though it may seem harsh and isn't suitable for all businesses, in some circumstances, having your employees sign a non-compete clause for a reasonable period post-employment can be a good deterrent for them trying to set-up a similar business.

In response to your specifics about training your employees on job pricing, you can explain that pricing a job is more than just labor and materials cost. It includes all the overheads like marketing, operational costs, taxes, and more.

Remember, if you consistently show that you value your employees, they are less likely to crave independence or feel the need to start a business to gain what they're already receiving.
 

Papa John

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There is a difference in mindset between an employee and an entrepreneur.
An employee barely wants to work 8 hours.
An entrepreneur is willing to work 16+ hours a day so he doesn't have to work for someone else.

So a dishonest tech will take the easy road and just do side-jobs and steal from his employer.

I hire and train people to understand that their their hourly wage, costs the company 3 times more then what they are being paid to cover all the expenses.
My guys take "ownership" because I pay them Commission only.
They can do things to increase their pay and still only work 8 hours, with out all the headache of ownership.
 

Mikey P

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BIG WOOD

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The positive aspects of these below I'm proud to say have bee established in my business
  1. Advancement: Herzberg defined advancement as the upward and positive status or position of someone in a workplace.
    Meanwhile, a negative or neutral status at work represents negative advancement (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017).
  2. The work itself: The content of job tasks can positively or negatively affect employees.
    The job’s difficulty and level of engagement can dramatically impact satisfaction or dissatisfaction in the workplace (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017).
  3. Possibility for growth: Possibilities for growth exist in the same vein as Maslow’s self-actualization; they are opportunities for a person to experience personal growth and promotion in the workplace.
    Personal growth can result in professional growth, increased opportunities to develop new skills and techniques, and gaining professional knowledge (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017
    1. Responsibility: Responsibility encompasses both the responsibilities held by the individual and the authority granted to the individual in their role.
      People gain satisfaction from being given the responsibility and authority to make decisions. Conversely, a mismatch between responsibility and level of authority negatively affects job satisfaction (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017).
    2. Recognition: When employees receive praise or rewards for reaching goals or producing high-quality work, they receive recognition.
      Negative recognition involves criticism or blame for a poorly done job (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017).
    3. Achievement: Positive achievement can involve, for example, completing a difficult task on time, solving a job-related problem, or seeing positive results from one’s work.
      Negative achievement includes failure to progress at work or poor job-related decision-making (Alshmemri et al., 2017, 2017).

And as far as the Hygiene factors listed in that article, I don't see any of those being at risk from the platform my employee is being trained on. That's a relief. I think the mental hygiene is gonna be healthy

Right now, the salary part of the Hygiene isn't at 100% due to this month being slow (average 30-35hrs/week), but I gave him a $100 bonus last week for being such a valued partner in the business.

And for example: Today he's going to work with his dad (construction) because my business has no jobs today, so he said he doesn't mind at all. I told him once this slow time goes away, I'll be giving him plenty of work. That was also one of my worries. It's a bit frustrating that before my injury, I was 3-4 weeks booked out constantly last year and prior, and now I'm having trouble filling up a full week right after I hire someone!

But after reading this article, it's relaxed my paranoia to see that I'm going in the right direction to providing a good work environment
 
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Jimmy L

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Just a simple non -compete agreement you can print from online somewhere might scare him ( using proper DEI pronouns) ........enough
 
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Willy P

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Just a simple non -compete agreement you can print from online somewhere might scare him ( using proper DEI pronouns) ........enough
They aren't worth the paper they're printed on. You can't stop a person from earning an income. I had one guy that worked for me that ran off with a company I contracted to. It put a dent in my business for sure but I hammered it out and learned not to put a big chunk of eggs in one basket.
 

Connor

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IF they leave, you'll just have to treat them like they are any other competitor and out-market them. Unless you have all your eggs in one basket with one major commercial client, and they steal them, I wouldnt worry about it.
 
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Learn to love the process.. It's not if they leave, it's when they leave.. He has helped you help your shoulder heal, with your ability to teach another, everything happens for a reason and stepping stone for further growth..

Keep ya chin up Smatty boy..

ktv_secure_054076_1200x1200_jpg_image_slider_product_image_slider_zoom_jpg__1200×1200_.jpg
 

BIG WOOD

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I'll be having coffee with Steve Toburan this morning, Ill see if he has any PS advice for you....
The kid said he’s leaving because he has a job offer to work under an electrician to get his certificate bs after 2years. I can’t compete $with that nor can I offer competitive benefits.

I paid him good, and offered good growth with the company as experience and productivity climbed.
 

Kenny Hayes

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If he wants to be an electrician, you can’t compete with that. You can and probably do compete with their pay for a newby. The good thing about #Obamacare is it’s affordable for everyone. Sometime people don’t want to utilize it because of the political divide. You can help a newby with that after a certain time if they need it.
 
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BIG WOOD

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Just a simple non -compete agreement you can print from online somewhere might scare him ( using proper DEI pronouns) ........enough
I'm against making the employees sign a non-compete.
1. That puts the idea in their mind that this business makes them big money as an owner/op, and they'll quit.
2. That tells them that I have no trust in them. If I don't trust them, why am I hiring them?
 
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Brian H

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I'm against making the employees sign a non-compete.
1. That puts the idea in their mind that this business makes them big money as an owner/op, and they'll quit.
2. That tells them that I have no trust in them. If I don't trust them, why am I hiring them?
Let's say you have an employee sign a non-compete and they quit to go work elsewhere in the industry. You will have to hire an attorney to enforce it, costing a bundle of money as this is a civil case and not criminal. Then you have depositions, etc. to determine cause and damages.

I signed a non-compete 36 years ago under duress. I had worked for a competitor for 2 years before being asked (told) to sign a non-compete or I would be fired. With a new baby on the way, I couldn't refuse, so I did. 2 years later I was recruited by my current company and I jumped ship with the understanding that my current company would pay any legal fees if I was sued. The old company found out where I was working 1 1/2 years after I left and sued me. The end result was that we settled for a dollar value that was less than the old companies attorney fees. There is a bit more to it than that, but that is my experience with non-competes.

As an aside, in 2018 we bought the competitor I came from.
 

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