That Edward Fields Magic

RugTugnewbie

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2023
Messages
4
Location
Arizona
Name
Marina
I'm hoping you kind and uncensored folks could lend some advice to an artist who wants to make tufted rugs that last through generations (at least 3). I understand woven rugs stand the test of time, but my vision relies on tufting them. As the well educated and experienced carpet cleaners you all are, I'm hoping you can share your knowledge of what makes a tufted rug more high quality and longer lasting then others.

From what I've researched, the backing and adhesive play a large role in the performance of the rug. I've read that linen performs well as it is less susceptible to moisture and mold. I've read delamination can occur with the adhesive. I've looked at photos of the back of Edward Field's carpets and am wondering what his backing process was as far as the type of adhesive and backing fabric that was used.

I would love to make quality tufted rugs for my clients. And I would also love for the rugs not to be a pain in the ass to clean for carpet cleaners. I will be thankful for any and all advice.
 

The Great Oz

Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
5,118
Location
seattle
Name
bryan
So good to have you come here before making rugs for sale!

Too many of the Tiktok tufters make rugs with acrylic yarn, aerosol adhesives and the fad of the day foundation fabric. Ok if it's a hobby or to hang on the wall, but not tough enough to walk on and last.

A good tufted rug uses Monk's cloth, a heavyweight cotton or cotton blend fabric, as the foundation. If you want to add backing for more dimensional stability I'd recommend a strong scrim.

Using any of the cotton canvas or non-woven synthetic backings will make your rug look like the cheap Indian-sourced rugs.

#1 - Use high-grade and well-dyed rug wool as the tufting yarn.

#2 - Pack nap in very tightly. You'd have a tough time digging your fingers to the back of a premium quality tufted rug.

#3 - Use first quality latex.

Edward Fields and V'Soske add a scrim layer after the rug is finished. I've never seen one delaminate. (it's the latex)

You'll also notice that Fields quality rugs will double fold the selvedges to make a neat looking backing trim. Do this and edge wrapping isn't needed.

I'll keep my eye out for RugTug branded rugs.
 

RugTugnewbie

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2023
Messages
4
Location
Arizona
Name
Marina
@thegreatoz Wow, this is amazing advice. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise with me. It is very much appreciated. I will take everything you've shared and apply it as best as I can to my rugs. I am excited for this new journey in life :) thank you again!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mikey P

RugTugnewbie

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2023
Messages
4
Location
Arizona
Name
Marina
So good to have you come here before making rugs for sale!

Too many of the Tiktok tufters make rugs with acrylic yarn, aerosol adhesives and the fad of the day foundation fabric. Ok if it's a hobby or to hang on the wall, but not tough enough to walk on and last.

A good tufted rug uses Monk's cloth, a heavyweight cotton or cotton blend fabric, as the foundation. If you want to add backing for more dimensional stability I'd recommend a strong scrim.

Using any of the cotton canvas or non-woven synthetic backings will make your rug look like the cheap Indian-sourced rugs.

#1 - Use high-grade and well-dyed rug wool as the tufting yarn.

#2 - Pack nap in very tightly. You'd have a tough time digging your fingers to the back of a premium quality tufted rug.

#3 - Use first quality latex.

Edward Fields and V'Soske add a scrim layer after the rug is finished. I've never seen one delaminate. (it's the latex)

You'll also notice that Fields quality rugs will double fold the selvedges to make a neat looking backing trim. Do this and edge wrapping isn't needed.

I'll keep my eye out for RugTug branded rugs.

Hello there again,
I've been doing some deeper research for the liquid latex I'm going to use. From what I can conclude, Bond Products' AAT -1132 is the best in the industry. Here's a link
The only downside is the shipping cost is over half the product cost.

An alternative I see gaining popularity is Tufting Nation's TN-100 rug adhesive. It's made out of natural latex, as opposed to the synthetic latex that the AAT-1132 is composed of. Again, my main concern is the longevity of my rugs. In your experience, which type of latex performs better, natural or synthetic? Is there a high-quality latex brand you tend to favor over others?
 

The Great Oz

Member
Joined
Nov 25, 2006
Messages
5,118
Location
seattle
Name
bryan
The Bond product sounds pretty good with a 6 our cure time and drying white. You might try searching for carpet installation suppliers close to you, or search for latex edge sealer to find more choices.

We're currently using Taylor 710, partly because we can get it from a local supplier. Our purpose is primarily for edge sealing prep before other treatments, so cost isn't much of a factor. It dries amber and slightly tacky, so might not be what you want.
 
  • Like
Reactions: RugTugnewbie

RugTugnewbie

Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2023
Messages
4
Location
Arizona
Name
Marina
I took the plunge and purchased the AAT1132. Should get to me by next week. But I also want to test other options so I will be looking into the edge/seam sealer products also. I consider these next few months my trial and error testing phase. Thank you both very much for your insight 🙏
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mikey P

Latest posts

Top Bottom