Washing white walls - smokers & grease- TSP + will Peroxide help?

#3
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This wall was cleaned with TSP twice. They called, wanted to see what we could do. We used ICWC wall cleaning solution, modernistic has product called RENEW that works the same. I have also had success using Bio-Break with an Oxygen booster in a kitchen ( not sure that you are supposed to breath Bio-Break tho.)
 
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Help with odor, you mean? (I think you've got dirt covered with the TSP.) If it stinks I've heard Tabacattac works good--from Unsmoke. But if there is odor, remember it is everywhere--anything porous sucks up and holds on to stink tenaciously. Probably need ozone to help with that.
 
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Ultrapac Renovate works better washing walls than anything we have ever used. I've used stronger chems, Higher PH, boosted chems, ammonia base yet Ultra Pac Renovate out cleans them all. :cool:

Smoke, soot, nicotine its an amazing product. Very economical too.
 
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Ultrapac Renovate works better washing walls than anything we have ever used. I've used stronger chems, Higher PH, boosted chems, ammonia base yet Ultra Pac Renovate out cleans them all. :cool:

Smoke, soot, nicotine its an amazing product. Very economical too.
I've never used this, is it more for removing what you can physically see or removing the odor source that you can't see?
 
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Since I posted at the last moment before actually having to do the work, I couldn't try the good suggestions here. I used STPP boosted with Vol 40 (a quart in 5 quart container.)
Sprayed it on wall and ceiling (fine mist) and wiped with a flat floor mop.

Worked really nicely.

Thanks all.
 
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#16
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Since I posted at the last moment before actually having to do the work, I couldn't try the good suggestions here. I used STPP boosted with Vol 40 (a quart in 5 quart container.)
Sprayed it on wall and ceiling (fine mist) and wiped with a flat floor mop.

Worked really nicely.

Thanks all.
 
#17
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Since I posted at the last moment before actually having to do the work, I couldn't try the good suggestions here. I used STPP boosted with Vol 40 (a quart in 5 quart container.)
Sprayed it on wall and ceiling (fine mist) and wiped with a flat floor mop.

Worked really nicely.

Thanks all.
If it is a hard floor it is quicker and easier to put the product on with a window cleaning lambswool/synthetic washer giving it a good rub as you do. Then a squeegee off. The left over grime can be easily removed with a microfibre cloth.

Then a quick clean of the hard floor surface
 
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#18
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Enzymes can help a lot with a tobacco job, since many of the residues left behind by tobacco smoke are lipid-based. Anything that boosts pH into the 12+ range and acts as a saponifier (converting oils into soaps) will also help, which is why ammonia or lye work so well in wall washes.

Since such a high pH might be dangerous on a hardwood floor, STPP-based detergents and enzymes will be your best resource there.
 
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Never EVER had a problem with Ultrapac Renovate (10.5-11 RTU) on any surface. I'd be more concerned about excessive moisture on wood than the product. We don't use it for floors but any little drips are easily wiped up. 10.5-11 is about like any of the carpet preconditioners.

Enzymes? Are would you want to fook around with enzymes to wash walls? :eekk:
 
#21
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Enzymes? Are would you want to fook around with enzymes to wash walls? :eekk:
Because sometimes Nature really does have the answer, heh.

Lipase, amylase, and protease can cut through plant-oil residues very quickly without damaging paint, gypsum board, or any other building materials. Plus, laying it down with a foaming sprayer will keep the enzyme in contact with the surface and really lower the scrubbing time. You can even get those aggravating mini-blinds clean with little to no effort just by soaking them in a hot enzyme "bath" for an hour or so, then rinsing.

If I'm going after a soot-dense dry fire like electrical, I'm not going to bother with enzymes because there's nothing there for them to break down. But when there's an oil or grease element, like tobacco or cooking fires, enzymes can help break down those oils and make the job go faster. Plus, they're so much nicer to work with than ammonia...!
 
#23
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We make various wall washes at both neutral and higher alkaline pH. However, we use a blend on non-ionic surfactants (degreasing) and a cationic hydrotope which draws and holds fine particulates such as soot into the cleaning solution. I have been told that is the key to Renovate as well.
 
#25
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Lye works, but lye (caustic soda) cannot differentiate between oils and skin. ( I heard of a someone who got lye in their shoe and needed several skin grafts to repair the damage in case anyone wants to handle at full strength). Even at 1% in a formula, it is considered a hazardous corrosive material. We only use it in two formulas as over time we have replaced with surfactants and other alkaline ingredients. An oil plate test compared lye to lye and .5% surfactant. The surfactant multiplies the surface area that emulsifies and removes the oils spreading from 1/8 inch (lye alone) to 1 inch (lye and surfactant). Lye is good, but lye with a small amount of surfactant is much better.
 
#26
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Lye works, but lye (caustic soda) cannot differentiate between oils and skin. ( I heard of a someone who got lye in their shoe and needed several skin grafts to repair the damage in case anyone wants to handle at full strength). Even at 1% in a formula, it is considered a hazardous corrosive material. We only use it in two formulas as over time we have replaced with surfactants and other alkaline ingredients. An oil plate test compared lye to lye and .5% surfactant. The surfactant multiplies the surface area that emulsifies and removes the oils spreading from 1/8 inch (lye alone) to 1 inch (lye and surfactant). Lye is good, but lye with a small amount of surfactant is much better.
I hope you're not lyeing.
 

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