The Great Debate: Urine Removal Processes

Mikey P

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it's just your narcissism kicking in to warp drive is all.



..L.T.A.
Yet again, not a clue.




PXL_20231117_235224896~2.jpg
 

Mikey P

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I do know one thing though Larry, if I ever wanted to admire in lerson the world's finest fisherman, marksman, woodworker, self defense instructing, carpet wanding, spiritual but not religious in touched soul, peanut butter slathering chrome polishing, dry wall hanging, remodeler, mullet wearing, bullet reloading, pre- vacuuming handsome sun of a gun in the whole wide world, Id sure know who to get a hold of..
 
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SamIam

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It's my understanding that many customers overestimate our power to treat( eliminate would be a very strong term) urine despite their many attempts to take care of the urine stains and odor on their own. Sometimes, the customer will pay double if their standards are met. In households with pets with medical conditions, they have no choice but to have a carpet cleaning service quarterly. Sure, they have the financial means to do it.
Right now, I have an inventory of the following products that can be used to help with urine containment, and I know I'm not any closer to solving the urine problem. So yes, a great " urine debate" goes on.
You obviously never heard the song....


View: https://youtu.be/qchPLaiKocI?si=d94SnIuSfzAQf6tg
 

Jim Pemberton

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Another thread derailed.....sigh

Thank you to those who shared their experiences and insights.

Now I'll be clear as to why I posted this:

I continually question everything I think and believe, and therefore what I teach.

Back in the 70s and 80s, we sold a lot of portable wet and dry cleaning machines: First the Prochem Model 40 (few people alive today know what that was), then the Model 20, then the 20A, then once Prochem quit making them, a variety of Kleenrite machines. Our training was built around understanding what fabrics needed to be "wet cleaned" versus "dry cleaned". We did well selling these units all over the country, and the dry cleaning solvents that went with them.

Come the 1990s, more and more people were having success with low moisture tools and the use of acidic rinse agents. I tested those tools, products, and methods and found that those products and methods worked far better, with less health and safety hazards, and saved cleaners a lot of money.

I had to make a choice: Do I teach what sells expensive machines and chemicals, or what works best?

My decision killed a lot of revenue for my supplyl business, but I believe I did the right thing then.

I don't completely agree with Mike's position on urine odor control in the home. We know that Mike speaks in absolutes a lot, and tends to pillory those who disagree with him. But he's also been right enough in the 17 years I've known him that I overlook that tendency of his and pay attention.

I've paid a lot of attention to Meter Maid in this thread and others. He's not afraid to speak his mind for what he believes in, and while I have nearly 50 years experience with dichlor, I had reserved it mostly for skunk and death scene cleanup till now. Rug cleaners have had a great deal of success with it, but it hasn't been well studied in on location odor control.

My thanks to the rest of you for your contributions as well.

I've got tests cooking on a variety of products and procedures this morning as I type this.....

....AND I WON'T BE SHARING THE RESULTS. It may, or may not nuance or even drastically change how I train, but that's information that will show up in my classes and perhaps articles, but no here.

Why?

Because people should test what they use, or want to use, and come to their own conclusions. I'm no one special, just someone who has lasted a long time in this business because I don't really have any other skills.

In the end, no matter what you do, or don't do, what is most important is that your customers truly benefit from what you offer, and that what you charge them is worth it to them for what they receive.

Thanks again
 

Mikey P

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I don't completely agree with Mike's position on urine odor control in the home. We know that Mike speaks in absolutes a lot, and tends to pillory those who disagree with him. But he's also been right enough in the 17 years I've known him that I overlook that tendency of his and pay attention.

My urine process has matured to the point of having a "do as little as possible and create no harm policy".

Harm as in the likely chance of even worse odors and wicking.
Harm as in the fate of misleading customers for my finacial gain.
Harm as in the disgusting nature of it all, and the pissy attitude it puts me in.


I can say that what others do doesn't bother me, but it does, as over promising and over selling pet serivces harms the industry that I give so much to.

Excuse my pillorying attitude.
 
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Jim Pemberton

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I didn't mean to pique your ire sir.

I wouldn't have done all of this if your positions didn't make me think
 

jeffexe

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hilton ny
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jeff
Another thread derailed.....sigh

Thank you to those who shared their experiences and insights.

Now I'll be clear as to why I posted this:

I continually question everything I think and believe, and therefore what I teach.

Back in the 70s and 80s, we sold a lot of portable wet and dry cleaning machines: First the Prochem Model 40 (few people alive today know what that was), then the Model 20, then the 20A, then once Prochem quit making them, a variety of Kleenrite machines. Our training was built around understanding what fabrics needed to be "wet cleaned" versus "dry cleaned". We did well selling these units all over the country, and the dry cleaning solvents that went with them.

Come the 1990s, more and more people were having success with low moisture tools and the use of acidic rinse agents. I tested those tools, products, and methods and found that those products and methods worked far better, with less health and safety hazards, and saved cleaners a lot of money.

I had to make a choice: Do I teach what sells expensive machines and chemicals, or what works best?

My decision killed a lot of revenue for my supplyl business, but I believe I did the right thing then.

I don't completely agree with Mike's position on urine odor control in the home. We know that Mike speaks in absolutes a lot, and tends to pillory those who disagree with him. But he's also been right enough in the 17 years I've known him that I overlook that tendency of his and pay attention.

I've paid a lot of attention to Meter Maid in this thread and others. He's not afraid to speak his mind for what he believes in, and while I have nearly 50 years experience with dichlor, I had reserved it mostly for skunk and death scene cleanup till now. Rug cleaners have had a great deal of success with it, but it hasn't been well studied in on location odor control.

My thanks to the rest of you for your contributions as well.

I've got tests cooking on a variety of products and procedures this morning as I type this.....

....AND I WON'T BE SHARING THE RESULTS. It may, or may not nuance or even drastically change how I train, but that's information that will show up in my classes and perhaps articles, but no here.

Why?

Because people should test what they use, or want to use, and come to their own conclusions. I'm no one special, just someone who has lasted a long time in this business because I don't really have any other skills.

In the end, no matter what you do, or don't do, what is most important is that your customers truly benefit from what you offer, and that what you charge them is worth it to them for what they receive.

Thanks again
Well said Jim.
 
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Swani
My urine removal process. I don’t have a device that measures urine so I don’t to crazy with the process.
1. Vacuum. A shark vacuum is very easy to clean. I can do it with the whip hose from my truck mount. It dries on the way to the next job.
View attachment 125287

2. Set truck mount to lowest psi and highest heat. Chemical feed on 3-4. Dry Slury HWE only. No expensive pre treatments that work only 50%of the time.
Rotovac in.
View attachment 125290

View attachment 1252883. Wand out with same truck mount setting.
1 wet/4 dry (2 complete dry strokes front to back).
View attachment 125289
This job was a 3 bedroom only townhome. Took 1 hour 12 minutes from arrival to departure. I charged $215.
When you say Rotovac in, are you only using it to brush in, or are you doing extraction with it? What made you go with Dry Slurry? I've always been under the assumption that urine needs to be treated with an acid.
 

Luky

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Jan 19, 2023
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246
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Chicagoland
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Mario
The Great Debate went from urine to 💩
I hope everyone is having a wonderful Thanksgiving. Remember, we're supposed to be fit people, so no overindulging is permitted 🤣.
I'm glad I have two jobs tomorrow; I can't take the serenity of a peaceful house and inactivity for too long.
How do you
" cope" with having too much free time on your hands?

20231123_154309.jpg
 
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